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RESEARCHES «^. 
IN DIETETICS 

Nutritive Value of Rice: 

Only 19 oz. Necessary 

For Human Body 



MADRAS SURGEON- 
GENERAL'S STATEMENT 



* MADRAS, Nov. 25. 

The Acricultural Commission resumed 
tho oxamiiiation of Mr, Ran^anatlm Mu 
daliar this morning and afterwards pro. 
ocHxlod to record the evidence of Col. 
MacCarrison of tho Indiiin Medicid 
Service (retired). The latter said hr 
began hJM research work in his labovri. 
tory at Coonoor on nutrition in 191i*. 
The c(»nelusion he arrived at from h;? 
researches was that the basis of all di- 
seases in man, plant and animal wa^ 
maJnutrition owin;; to the poor qualiiv 
of the food. He found that oat ^f 
9.500,000 people attending hospitals in 
India more than 3 millions, sufT<Ted from 
diseases arising from malnntritiou. Le- 
prosy, rliolora and other chronic l^- 
seasca wero the eflfect of malnutntio:i 
and he had been considerably »tren;:tli 
fr\o(l in this view by his obscrvatioo 
that the incidence of cholera in tho 
Madras Presidency was 40 times grcale? 
than in tho Punjab, because while rico 
fundanioiitally a very poor diet not c,<\>. 
able of .supporting the human body form. 
e<l the- staple food of tho people of 
Madras, wheat was tho stapl? 
ood in the Punjab. The witness lu»il 
n view the institution of a rcso-ireii 
aboratory for investigating the qjoM 
t.ion of nutrition r»f man, plant and 
animal. He found Coonoor an ilcaJ 
place for his reMcareh and so far as 
he scope of research in nutrition was 
conrx^rne*! witness saw the need for « 
rosoanh ifntitute in every province be 
»*>'^ 'irch institute directly undoi 

til t'nt of JnUia. 

Thr 'lat the great j.r» 

blem f was fhn provision 

■■tnf 



Dr. Hyder whether the witnees wa.^ of 
opinion that graduatcvj in bio.cliemi.^^Try. 
medicine and physiology from Ind ho 
universities could be entrusted to ca»ry 
on under his directions the work li*: I 
was doing, Hie Colonel said that un. 
doubtedly Indians had a special aptilr.d*» 
for this kind of work. 

Change of European Diet 

Dr. Hyder asked whether the witnc» 
was a%vnre tliat « ' ; from ordinnr^ 

Indian diet to 1 diet was irir- 

ing dangt rous cii..i.> uii the 'physlqac 
of educated Indians. Colonol MacCiui- 

on said that undoubtedly tho undersir. 
ed Indians were jumping from the fiy. 

ng pan into the lire by such a chan.,*?. 
For instance the consumption of tiniird 
fruits in preference to wholesome i.Ci'i 
fruits wjus not desirable. Tho fr\'i. 
dencc of C(»l. MacCarrison was illustrat- 
ed with diagrams and graphs shownii; 
the effect of a drficiency diet and al«) 
the comparative effect of vitamins in 
animal ojid human food. 

EXPERIMENTS IN DIET ETinCS 

How Much Bice a Man Needs 

After lunrh. tho Royal C-oniniission 
examinctl Major General Hutchinson 
Rurgeon.Gcncral to tho Government cf 
Madras. In the course of his wrif.tOT* 
evidence, the witness stated that very 
little work on the nutritive values of 
food grains apait from that now being 
carried out by Lt.-Col. MacCarrison at 
Coonoor had been done in India. Tho 
most notable investigationj\|i^ that un. 
dertakcn by lit.Col. MfcCay on tho 
dietary of prfsoneis in B^gal jails and 
published in 1010. A man in full woik, 
i.d the witness, required only 10 oz. 



of rice to provide his carbo-hydrato n»X!d 
and any excess over this quantity re. 
siiltt^d on very defevtive protein absorp- 
tion. Further invt-stigation was nr. 
gently needed in India along linos of 
the actual dietary of the different clas.scf» 



Can You Guess 
This Man's Age? 

See if You Can Tell Within 25 Years; 
The Author Couldn't; But He Stuck 
With Hobart Bradstreet Until He Re- 
vealed His Method of Staying Young 

I USED to pride myself on guessing people's ages. That 
was before 1 met Hobart Bradstreet, whose age I missed 
by a quarter-century. But before 1 tell you how old 
he really is. let me say this: 

My meeting-up with Bradstreet I count the luckiest 
day of my life. For while we often hear how our minds and 
bodies are about 50% efficient — and at times feel it to be 
the truth — he knows why. Furthermore, he knows how 
- in five minutes — and he showed me how. 



■inciple that is the 
foundation of ail chiropractic, naprapathy, mechano- 
therapy, and even osteopathy. Only he does not touch 
a hand to you; it isn't necessary. 



And here is the secret: he keeps his spine in trim. 

Any man or woman who thinks spine motion doesn't make 
a difference should try it! It is easy enough. First, though, 
you may be curious to learn why a healthy spine puts 
one in an entirely new class physically. The spinal column 
is a series of tiny bones, between which are pads or cushions 
of cartilage. Nothing in the ordinary activities of us 
humans stretches the spine. So it "settles" day by day, 
until those once soft and resilient pads become thin as a 
safety-razor blade — and just about as hard. One's spine 
(the most wonderfully designed shock-absorber known) 
is then an unyielding column that transmits every shock 
straight to the base of the brain. 

Do you wonder folks have backaches and headaches? 
That one's nerves pound toward the end of a hard day? 
Or that a nervous system may periodically go to pieces? 
For every nerve in one's body connects with the spine, 
which is a sort of central switchboard. When the "insula- 
tion," or cartilage, wears down and flattens out, the nerves 
are exposed, or even impinged — and there is trouble on 
the line. 

Now, for proof that sublaxation of the spine causes most 
of the ills and ailments which spell "age" in men or women. 
Flex your spine — "shake it out" — and they will dis- 
appear. You'll feel the difference in ten minutes. At 
least, I did. It's no trick to secure complete spinal laxation 
as Bradstreet does it. But like everything else, one must 
know how. No amount of violent exercise will do it; not 
even chopping wood. As for walking, or golfing, your 
spine settles down a bit firmer with each step. 

Mr. Bradstreet has evolved from his 25-year experience 
with spinal mechanics a simple, boiled-down formula of 
just five movements. Neither takes more than one minute, so 
it means but five minutes a day. But those movements! 
1 never experienced such compound exhilaration before. 
1 was a good subject for the test, for I went into it with a 
dull headache. At the end of the second movement I 
thought I could actually feel my blood circulating. The 
third movement in this remarkable Spine-Motion series 
brought an amazing feeling of exhilaration. One motion 
seemed to open and shut my backbone like a jack-knife. 

I asked about constipation. He gave me another motion 
— a peculiar, writhing and twisting movement — and 
fifteen minutes later came a complete evacuation! 

Hobart Bradstreet frankly gives the full credit for his 
conspicuous success to these simple secrets of Spine- 
Motion, He has traveled about for years, conditioning 
those whose means permitted a specialist at their beck and 
call. I met him at the Roycroft Inn, at East Aurora. 
But Bradstreet, young as he looks and feels, thinks he has 
chased around the country long enough. He has been 




I know what these remarkable mechanics of the spine 
have done for me. 1 have checked up at least twenty-five 
other cases. With all sincerity I believe nothing in the whole 
realm of medicine or specialism can quicker remake, re- 
juvenate and restore one. 1 wish you could see Bradstreet 
himself. He is arrogantly healthy; he doesn't seem to 
have an>' nerves. Yet he puffs incessantly at a black 
cigar that would floor some men, drinks two cups of coffee 
at every meal, and i don't believe he averages seven hours 
sleep. It shows what a sound nerve-mechanism will do. 
He says a man's power can and should be unabated up to 
the age of 60, in every sense, and I have had some astonish- 
ing testimony on that score. 

Would 3 

action and feelings, do you want to see your energies just 
about doubled ? It is easy. No "apparatus" is required. 
Just Bradstreet 's few, simple instructions, made doubly 
clear by his photographic poses of the five positions. Re- 
sults come amazingly quick. In less than a week you 
should have new health, new appetite, new desire, and new 
capacities; you'll feel vears lifted off your mind and 
body. This man's method can be tested without risk. 
If you feel enormously benefited, everything is yours to 
keep and you have paid for it all, the enormous sum of 
$3.00! Knowing something of the fees this man has been 
accustomed to receiving, I hope his naming $3.00 to the 
general public will have full appreciation. 

The $3.00 which pays for everything is not sent in ad- 
vance, nor do you make any payment or deposit on delivery. 
Requests will be answered in turn. Try how it feels to have 
a full-length spine, and you'll henceforth pity men and 
women whose nerves are in a vise! 



HOBART BRADSTREET, Inc., Suite 7817. 
030 S. Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
1 will try your Spine-Motion without risk if you will 
provide necessary instructions. Send everything postpaid, 
without any charge or obligation, and I will try it five days. 
If 1 find Spine-Motion highly beneficial 1 can remit just 
$3 in full payment; otherwise I will return the material and 
will owe you nothing. 

Name 

Address 



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THE 
LAZY COLON 

(Large Intestine) 
By CHARLES M, CAMPBELL 
ALBERT K. DETWILLEH. M.D. 

''The human intestiml hm t n the most prolific 
source Of <U.easer~P,oJcsso, Foges, VienTa. 




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■pies he lays down are fully digested 






"jc. nis celeDrated 
?Sth year (1923). The ni 

problem of eivinir at th^ cam^ <-;™ ^?" ®^ ^^^^^ solved the 

information on this subject^™ ^ Popular and authoritative 

PARTIAL LIST OF 37 CHAPTER TITLES 

f ife^}lL°o7'^'are? Sr^^'S/.^'lL^,,? H-^jthv ■^"H'^i S-^-ing 
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Pressure; Purgatives — ' ThHr P "^ °^ ""^ Arteries and Blood 
Vitamin Facts}^ Intelligent u4 of fh'/ l?""^ Improper Use; 
Tongue— Its (^aii«e»nHi\T„^ °',''!f Enema; The Coaterf 
Sought Remedy? Nevv"Lig^t^SR'£?l'=t'i=='';,°f Milk the I«^g. 
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PRICE $2.50 POSTPAID 



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Rare 
old ma 

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Mer^tior^ of Harper's Magazine is the best introducHc 




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44 



EYE- EDUCATION" | 

By W. H. BATES, M. D. 

The author of this book presents evidence 
that all errors of refraction are caused \Z 
stra.n-and cured by rest or relaxation ' 

The complete method of treatment U a 
discard h.s glasses and improve his vision. 

Price $3.00 Postpaid 



AU leading bookstores. 



- "^c ijj.uu rostpaid 
New York City 








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APPENDICITIS AND VEGETARIANISM. 

SxR^ — For many years past I have had the opportunity of 
;eing a large number of vegetarian patients, and appen- 
icitis is certainly not an unknown disease amongst them, 
inly during the last few months I have had a girl under 
ly care whose brother was taken home from school, was 
ransf erred to a hospital, was operated on, and died within 

week. The sister shortly afterwards developed similar 
ymptoms and was admitted to hospital under my care, and 
as treated partly by fasting, partly by restricted dieting, 
artly by severe restriction of all fluids, and partly by 
\o internal use of olive and castor oil, with extremely 
itisfactory results. Both these patients were life vege- 
irians, and their parents had been so for years also. 

So far, however, I have never lost a patient suffering 
rom appendicitis, nor have I ever yet found it necessary 
o operate upon one. 

In my personal investigations among the villagers of 
ndia and Northern Africa, and among the peasants of 
ijiguria and the West Indies, I came to the conclusion that 
»eople who ate little meat and who lived upon the simpler 
oods which prevented constipation were less liable to 
ippendicitis than those who ate a considerable amount of 
neat and who more or less habitually found it necessary 
■.o take aperients. 

If it is true that our modern and more meaty dietary 
s responsible for the increase in the prevalence of this 
iiscase there must be a sound scientific reason for it. May 
[ suggest the reason? In carnivorous animals the intestine 
is shortened, so that by the time the faeces resulting from 
flesh food have reached the preliminary putrefactive stage 
they are ejected from the body. Nature has taught the 



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Damivorae that these faeces, even when excreted, are 
iangerous, and therefore carnivorous animals either make 
boles for, or scratch dirt over, their defaecated masses. In 
man the intestine is much longer, and owing to this not 
a few eminent surgeons have called the lower bowel " the 
sewage gut," and have advised its removal. 

The alternative, from the point of view of scientifio 
hygiene, appears therefore to be, either to live like the 
carnivorae — and amputate the lower bowel — or live like the 
ancestral anthropoid from whom we derived our alimentary 
canal, and retain it ! 

It is, I think, generally admitted that it is the Bacillus 
coli which infects the appendix. Now the B. coli is 
normally a beneficent inhabitant of the intestine, but when 
the lower intestine becomes a sewer, and especially when 
constipation gives a still longer time for putrefactive 
changes to take place in its contents, the B. coli develops 
pathogenic characteristics, may become ambulatory, and 
may set up a focus for disease in any other part of the 
body. 

The actual increase in appendicitis pari passu with the 
increased consumption of flesh food may, 1 think, be 
gathered — even though not necessarily proved — by the 
following statistics: 





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Sib „^Vith rcjxard to tho alleged greater incidence of 
a; may I sugj^cst thnt a coui- 

pa il is put in the do(k? 

When a siuiicnb 1 read iti .Michaol Foator'a truly sciontifio 
Phyuology that carbohyilrutcs mixed mith proteins in tho 
•toinach delayed tho digestion and assimilation of tho 
proteins. It stems to mu tiiat hero au have one of tho 
great rules of succcsitful dietetics. 

In my own practice I hare found that by persuading 
people to simplify their meals — to eat mainly proteins at 
one meal, keeping the mrbohydmtes for a non-protein meal 
— thoir digestion an^ 'h have greatly improved. 

Wo havo had twc» i.ods of treatment of urio 

acid diseases — (1) tl;o Salisbury diet (mainly proteia 
feeding), and (2) vegetarianism, each upheld by its pro* 
feasors to bo most successful ; two apparently opposite 
dietaries. What is common to these two methods? Sim- 
plicity; tho avoidance of mixing indiscriminately in ono 
ineni proteins and carbohydrates. 

In the sumo woy " liquid dieticians,'* if one may so call 
them, havo cunceiitratod on the cavils of alcohol; when tho 
arils, to any truly scientific observer, aro so manifestly 
ita misuse and abuse. — I am, etc., 
flMkwtU HeAth. Duckj. Oct ITtb. 0. D. PaRKFR. 



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lished in 1914. 

The tljjid was first published in liK»l. 

THE CAUSES OF CANCER, and tlic Moans to be 
adopted lor it.s ProXcntion. By A. Kabaoliati. 
6^X4. 47 pp. Daniel. Is. n. " 
This book is largely a commentary on the views 
o{ Mr. Ellis Barker. The author traces "a definite 
connexion between cancer and the iniiversally 
spread but wrong ideas regarding nutrition and the 
functiors of food in the body." His entire medical 
cxpeiience, he says, confirms his opinion tliat the 
disease (and many other illnesses, incidentally) is 
due to " fermentation in the digestive tract caused 
by too frequ3nt feeding." 
q-<«T.' xrrkivrTUTjr'R Al"r MAXT'at - 

MEDICAL. 
GOOD HEALTH AND HAPPINESS. By J. Ellis 

Barker. With an Introduction by Sir W. 

AitBiiHxoT Lane, Bt, 7^X5^,- 525 pp. Murray. 

7s. 6d. n. 

Mr. Ellis Barker and those who, with him, are 
conducting the " New Health Society " are render- 
ing a valuable public service. They are opening to 
all men and women the ways to knowledge about 
tlie principles of healthy living and the application 
of these princip.le.s in everyclay life. In the pre- 
sent volume Mr. Barker gives a careful and care- 
fully documented review of the opinions of medical 
.men in many lands on tT!^ subject of " Good Health 
and Happiness." He incorporates in this review, 
and the addition is the most interesting part of his 
book, a personal document in which lie tells how- 
lie himself found good health after he had lost it 
and how he protects and guards his new possession. 

Tiie general idea underlying his book is that with 
"wliich Sir Arbuthnot Lane has already made the 
medical prf)fession familiar. Human beings in a 
state of civilization have adopted^ Mr. Barker thinks, 
habits of diet and other habits which are irrecon- 
cilable with healthy living. The wrong kinds of- 
food are eaten ; too much food is eaten ; elimina- 
tion of waste products is largely neglected. Mr. 
Barker gives the following account of his condi- 
tion before he began to practise what he is preach- 
ing: "My physical weakness had become so great 
that I had to give up. walking. A few minutes on 
my feet would prostrate me and throw me into a 
profound perspiration. For years I did not dare 
to take a cold, bath. I did not dare to travel on 
the top of ail onniibus when the summer Avas at its 
hottest for I would get a serious cold or chill which 
vould not leave me for many months." But now, 
at week-ends 1 try to go to the country for two 
or three days whenever possible. If I go away for 
two days I walk about 50 miles in the hills. If I 
go away for three days I do about 80 miles." 

The book is characterized by sincerity and en- 
thusiasm ; its author is clearly master of his sub- 
ject and speaks always with deep conviction. Even 
though it may be felt by some that tlie problem 
of health is not quite so simple as Mr. Barker 
believes it to be. the experiences \\ere recounted and 
the advice given cannot fail to be helpful to the 
vast majority of men and women. 

THE CRADLE OF THE WORLD AND CANCER : 
A Disease of Civilization. By Ernest H. Tipper. 
7^2X5, 142 pp.. Charles Murray (11, Ludgate- 
square, E.C.4). 5s. n. 
Dr. Tipper, retired from the West African Medical 

jBervice, is convinced that cancer is a disease of 
ivilization. due to unhealthy habits, particularlj^- 
feeding, of which excessive meat eating is the 
>rst feature. He here describes the habits — dietar'*- 
. — of a West African tribe, mainly veget 
b Bene, among whom cancer is non-exis* 
I'^npr is; not a rigid vegetarian, /"^'i ''" 



cause 
and r 

It ia 
finch 
fores 



THE 

MA 

ix. 

Se 

MYS 

. Tal 



MEDICAL. 
MALIGNANCY AND EVOLUTION. A /biological 
Inquiry into the Nature and Caiises of Cancer. 
By MoRLEY Roberts. 82 x 5J 319 pp. Eveleigh 
Nash. 18s. n. . " 

Mr. Morley Roberts is one of the few laymen who 
writes convincingly on medical matters. But in this 
book he presents a thesis to which few, perhaps, 
of those engaged on actual research work in con- 
nexion with cancer would be willing to subscribe. 
This is that " malignancy is the diversion of energy 
from high differentiation into the proliferation of 
hardy, low-grade epithelia." In other words, the 
cancer cells, or their ancestors, were born for a 
better fate. They were meant to develop into useful 
members of the body community, each with 
its specialized function. But the pr(*sence of con- 
tinued irritation or trauma has prevented this 
normal evolution. The cell, balked in its natural 
progress towards utility and threatened by a hostile 
environment, takes on " hardy " growth " which 
can endure irritation." 

The book displaj-s great knowledge of the litera- 
ture of cancer and is stimulating as a review of that 
literature. It is written, too, with deep sincerity 
and conviction. But it lacks that support of experi- 
mental proof without which, at the present time, all 
studies of cancer are severely handicapped. The 
medical profession cannot but be grateful for so 
much care and painstaking thought ; but it is 
doubtful if Mr. Roberts's ^iew will bring real 
enlightenment to any doctor who has, himself, 
grappled with this problem. 



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DISORDERS OF SPEECH. 

-^ 

\l'HASIA AND KlKDRE» DlSOKDERS OF SpEECH. 

Bv IlKNUY Head. Two volumes. (Lam- 
bridge University Press. £3 3s. net.) 
The subject of aphasia, those peculiar dis- 
orders of spiHH-h which occur in disease of j 
certain parts of one cerebral hemisphere of tho 
brain, is one which must appeal not ']^'^y^^ 
the physician but to the psychologist and philo- 
sopher as well. The medical history of the 
la-st fifty years presents ample evidence of the 
interest aroused in the forms and nature of 
aphasia, while the literature of the subject 
has reached such enormous dimensions that 
any attempt to explore it all is a task ta appal 
tJie most industrious student. 

Headers, and especially non-medical readers, 
of these volumes will be particularly gratefu 
to the author for the admirable historical 
introduction to the subject afforded in the first 
two chapters. The pioneer work of Oall has 
never reallv received due recognition, probably 
because bis name later became associated with 
the now wholly discredited pseudo-science of 
])hrenology. The gradual evolution oi our 
prest-nt knowledge of this subject is carefully 
traced in the earlier chapters, and the epoch- 
making discoveries of Broca and the subse- 
quent arguments on his theories are 
graphically described. In his admiration for 
the genius of Huchlings .lackson, to whose 
yiews on these speech-disorders a special 
chapter is devoted, we think that tho 
author has hardly been entirely fair to 
those other workers whom he rather con- 
temptuously designates as the " diagram 
makers." *A natural, but in its results 
very dangerous, desire to simplify the 
problem doubtless led them into a posi- 
tion which has proved untenable, confusing 
anatomy, physiology and psychology in 
. their altemptefi classification. Tins con- 
futed classification, however, supported by 
diagrams in all the textbooks, may be said to 
have held the field till Pierre Mane in 1900 
rud<4ly disturbed the equanimity of the 
mediral world by a series of papers m w'hich 
he i)ropound(>fl entin-ly new theories of his 
own. Since that time it is not too much to 
say with 1 )r. 1 lead that chaos has reigned. The 
majority of physicians, teachers and students 
have bw'U content to accept the classiluatioii 
f the " diagram makers," with its concep- 
tions of " wi.rd deafness," " word blindness, 
auditory and visual " word centres " and so 
on, as a working hyi)Othesis, though many 
have felt with Dr. Head that such a classifica- 
tion was too arbitrary and often imix)ssible to 
lorrelat. ■■••»• •'•" f"'-^ •-' '''"i,;,! . \periencc. 



» Dr Head tells us how he set out to re- 
investigate for himself the whole subject of 
aphasia. The greater j^art of tho first volume 
is ..ccui)ied by an account of his own experi- 
ences and conclusions, while the second is 
wholly devoted to detailed reports of cases, 
ft bibliography and admirable indexes. The 
methods of examination which ho employed 
were onL'inal; and his experience has led him 
to devise a series of tests which are carefully 
graded and designed to test not only tho nature 
but the degree of the disorder of speech pre- 
s^.„t— or as he terms it, the " disorder of sym- 
ijolic forinulation and expression." Ingenuity, 
much labour and great experience are dis- 
cernible in these methods of examination, 
which may well replace in great measure 
those more commonly employed. His 
long and detailed studies of tho reported 
cases have enabled him to describe four 
clinical varieties of aphasia as suthciently 
distinct to merit particular descriptive 
titles These four varieties he calls 
respectively " verbal," " syntactical," " seman- 
tic " and " nominal." Such titles, he is careful 
to 'point out, arc only indications of the form 
of disorder of speech assumed and are in no 
way designed to connote any particular physio- 
logical defect, still less any exact anatomical 
h.calization. Dr. Head emphasises Ins view 
that in^phasia the loss of function is expressed 
in terms of the complete act (speech) and does 
not reveal the elements out of which it is com- 
posed or developed. Obviously such an 
opinion is entirely at variance ^vlth the sup- 
posed existence of " centres," of which much 
has been heard in the past ; for it was a.ssumec 
that destruction of a particular centre woiilcl 
remove the particular component of speech 
f(,r which that centre was responsible leaving 
the others intact. It is useful to find this 
misconception emphatically repudiated. 

It will be seen that Dr. Head's classification, 
and indeed his whole approach to the pro- 
blem is psychological rather than physiologi- 
cal He has deprecated, indeed, the making o 
any classification of types of aphasia, but som. 
subdivision is necessary, if only to assist^ i 
the more practical i^roblem of the localizatio 
of the lesions resi>onsible for the different di 
orders of spfunh ; and it is interesting to eoi 
pare his classification with the older, or wh 
inay be called the classical, views. J bus I 
verbal aphasia corresponds roughly to wl 
has generally been termed " motor aphasip 
and in this connexion we entirely agree v 
him in finding a dt-fect in written as well a 
spoken speech. His syntactical form, ag 
Jould under the old scheme fall mu er 
hejiding of a " jargon " aphasia but hi.' 
nl«n«linn of the disorder i- d.ff.rent. 



1 

I 



under the older scheme an auditory defect is 
presumed (a word deafness), but according 
to Dr. Head it is a loss of the power of co- 
ordinating words into phrases that is the essen- 
tial difficulty. Under nominal and semantic 
aphasia would have been included many 
varieties of speech defects for which many 
different names have been used. Thus 
a verbal amnesia would form part of the pic- 
ture of nominal aphasia, while many would 
class his semantic aphasia as a form of 
agnosia. But where such a profound difference 
exists, not only in conclusions but in the whole 
manner of treatment of the question, little 
advantage is to be gained by comparing Dr. 
Head's views with those of others. For he 
refuses to employ such terms as " agnosia," 
"apraxia," ''alexia" or "agraphia." In this atti- 
tude his opinions will no doubt receive decided 



opposition ; for there are on record a number of 
well authenticated and carefully observed cases 
where such isolated speech disturbances as 
alexia and agraphia have been demonstrated. 
Although he is only to a minor extent con- 
cerned with the problems of the localization of 
the lesions responsible for the different forms of 
aphasia, yet the chapter on this subject is one 
full of interest, if only for the ingenious 
method elaborated by him and his collaborators 
for the determination of the sites 6f the lesions 
without post-mortem examinations. Actually 
it rnay be stated that his conclusions as to 
localization do not essentially contradict the 
opinions commonly held. 

Put very briefly, Dr. Head's main contention 
may be expressed in the statement that a de- 
fect in physiological function is expressed in 
psychical terms (disordered speech). Within 
the space of a short review it is impossible to do 
justice to the mass of valuable material col- 
lected in these volumes. Medical science al- 
ready owes much to the author's valuable re- 
searches in the past; and his latest contribution 
is in every way a worthy successor. Whatever 
may be the views destined to be held by pos- 
terity, it is certain that no student of aphasia 
will be able to neglect this original work, which 
in itself constitutes a worthy monument to the 
author's tireless scientific enthusiasm. 



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The Three Principles of Ayurveda. 



^JL^ T>^i. -4. 



y-^-i^f^ f^ V.V. 



Pt, Sbiv Sharma. Raj Vaidya Patiala, 
writes : — 

Dr. Nelson's first accusation is that the 
Ayurvedic and Hakimi systems may 
have the virtue of being as old as the 
time, but also as dead as the "Dodo." 
Dr. Nelson speaks the truth when he 
says that the ** Dodo" is extinct, but 
this part of his statement is the only 
truth throughout his splenetic oatburst. 
Dr. Nelson, while condemning them 
severely, knows that 90 per cent of the 
Indian population (including well edu- 
cated men of the East and the West) 
resort to the indigenous system, and are 
benefited by it. The system adopted by 
10 per cent is living ; the system adop- 
ted by 90 per cent is dead as the 
*'Dodo"! 

. I am wondering at the perverse 
mentality of the man who refuses to 
listen to the repeated cry of the Ayur- 
vedic physicians that the theory of the 
vata, pitta and kapha is not the old dis- 
carded humoral theory of the Grroeks 
of air, bile and phlegm, but something 
difiereiit. The humoral theory is a 
mere distortion of the real itridosha 
principle (I do not use the word 'theory. 
in the latter case, as theory in the 
West means falsehood eagerly spoken 
by a host, enthusiastically admired for 
sometimes, and then refuted and re- 
placed by another, to be submitted to 
the same fate in the course of time ) 
The scientific nature of the tridosha 
principle is as true as the ignorance of 
Ayurveda on the part of our worthy 
critic. I present the explanation of it 
in the light of the modern science, 
as briefly as it is possible in the small 
scope of this article. 

"VAYU" OB CELL-FOECE. 

Mahamahopadhyaya Kaviraj Gana- 
nath Sen, :M. A., L. M. S., explains it 
thus: — 



**The Ayurvedic physicians believe 
that all physiological functions are con- 
trolled by three principles. One is 
the motive or dynamic principle, the 

friiLciple of motion and multiplication. 
t is born with the first cell, which, 
when impregnated, begins to divide and 
become gradually organised through 
what turns out to be an inherent force. 
Th's force is known as vayM or hay\k 
of. '* Bios" (Greek), meaning life- 
the vital force or cell-fore^ It 
difierentiates the cells into different 
structures. It creates blood vessels, 
lymphatics and nerves. The inherent 
force manifests itself later on in higher 
evolution in nerve-structures aB nerve- 
forces. But this nerve-force is "aot the 
sole connotation of vayu, as some peo- 
ple understand. It is a dilferentiated 
and more crystallised form, as it 

were, of vayu. But the original mean- 
ing of vayu is not nerve-force, but cell- 
force A man, for instance, grows a 
tumour. It becomes gradually orga- 
nised. Blood vessels grow into it, 
nerves spread in it. Gradually, if it 
comes in contact with hard substances, 
ft horny growth takes place 
on it. Who guides all 

these ? It is this cell-force, or rather 
the correlated cell-force or vital force. 
This is vayu. Hence vayu is not wind 
or gas, as some people such as Dr. Nelson 
suppose. A true conception of vayu 
is not incompatible with any of the 
teachings of the modern physiology. 

*' PITTA:" METABOLIC PRINCIPLE. 

*' I now come topt^^a^the seoond 
principle. It is a principle that 
generates and keeps up the heat of the 
body. It manifests itself in different 
forms ard different chemical activities, 
mainly digestion and assimilation. It 
prepares the material to ba absorbed 



«nd the power to metabolise the nourish- 
ment that is absorbed into the body. 
In one word, it keeps up the equili- 
brium of heat and combustion. And 
on the mental side it is 

the principle that prepares 

the field for t^e perception of light. 
They say that the perception of light 
is made by vayu, but the sensation is 
cooked by pitta. They say that at the 
end of the retina a chemical process 
takes place by which the image is print- 
ed for the time being on the white 
surface. In the western physiology it is 
the photo-chemical substance; we call 
it a alochaka pitta. The metabolism that 
occurs in the skin and muscles is attri- 
buted to pitta. In one word, you can 
take pi^fo as guiding all the metabolic 
activities of the body. It is what the 
ancients called the substaining 'fire.' 
* 'KAPHA" COOLING PRINCIPLE. 
*1 will next take up kapha or sleshma 
the cooling or preservative principle. 
It is said that, just as there is the 
principle which keeps up the fire 
burning, there is another principle 
which keeps up the coolness. 
This cooling principle acts like water- 
jacket of the internal combustion engine. 
It keeps the body cool by giving normal 
secretions which are preservative. It 
always keeps secreting a cooling or 
mucous membrane in the mouth* in the 
respiratory passages, in the eyes, in 
the stomach and in the joints. Wherever 
there i» friction and wherever there 
is heat production, there is^this principle 
manifesting itself in the secretion of 
preservative fluids. As there are several 
forms of crude pitta like gastric juice, 
bile, and pancreatic juice, so also you 
will find this principle manifested in 
several crude and tangible forms." 

If Dr. Nelson speaks again, I shall try 
!to explain the action of these three 
forces on the human system thoroughly. 
In the meantime I hope that this will 
correct the a.ngle of vision of our critic. 
I would make one request. Before 
Dr, Nelson enters the field again as a 
•' frank critic" of Ayurveda, he should 
study Sanskrit and the Ayurveda ; for 
1 believe he wrote so carpingly because 
he knew nothing about this system. 



I shall finish after repeating Dr. 
Nelson's fiaishin? touch: "An India u 
friend once said to me that man was a 
Curious individual. He was endowed 
with a certain amount of intelligen ce 
which he used foolishly. I agree." 

I also agree. 



Surya-Namaskaras — (By Balasaheb Pantpratinidhi, 
Chief of Aundh, State Press, Price Re. 1/-.) The 
title of the book tells that Namaskaras are meant for 
" health, efi&ciency and longevity " and the whole is 
designed to scientifically prove how these are pro- 
moted by doing Namaskaras. A large number of 
photographs are given to illustrate every position taken 
in doing this kind of exercise, which is described as 
the easiest and the simplest form, available even for 
the most poor. Even European experts have 
recognised the virtues of this kind of 
Indian exercise; the author has given pro- 
fuse quotations from such experts. Special chap 
ters have been added to reply to the sceptics and to 
narrate the author's own experiences of long standing. 
Much emphasis is laid on diet and habits and full treat- 
ment is given to the two subjects. The exercise of 
Surya Namaskaras can well be taken by women and 
it is shown that they are benefitted in bodily and men- 
tal health. A chart of Namaskaras also is supplied 
along with the book, and it deserves to be hung up 
on the walls for daily use. This is perhaps 
the first book in English of this kind and 
we trust that it will explain to English- 
speaking people the peculiar merits of one of the effec- 
tive forms of Indian physical culture system. The 
Chiefsaheb has expended a large amount of labour and 
care for the production of the book. Such books ought 
to spread the practice of Namaskaras among the young 
and the old. 
t 
i 
s 
I 
c 

t 

1^ 



ANOTHER CHALLENGE TO ALLOP/ITHS. 

Pt. Thakur Datt Sharma's Posers. 



Pt. Thakur 

dhara writes : 

Almost all 



Datta Sharma of Amrit- 

the contributors to the 
Civil and Military Gazette against the 
indijjfenous systems have quoted in- 
stances of inexperienced Hakims and 
thereby tried to prove that all the 
genuine Vaidyas and Hakims are devoid 
of any sound knowledge of curing dis- 
eases. I admit that there are bogus 
Vaidyas and Hakims ; but what blund- 
ers do not the bogus doctors commit ? 
I assert that it is not our fault. If the 
Government condesoend to sanction 
even half the amount for the indigenous 
systems that they spend over the 
Allopathic system, open institutions for 
the training of students and introduce 
legislation to the efieot that none but 
the trained and certified Vaidyas or 
Hakims will be allowed to practise, 
these bogus physicians will be automa- 
ticAlly thrown out of the field. 

In Allopathy there are many drugi 
that can suppress a disease for the time 
being. But only that treatment is 
successful which cures the malady, and 
not suppressei it temporarily. Our ad- 
versaries boast of their diagnosis. But 
if even after a satisfactory 

diagnosis a patient is not cured, of what 
use it would be to him? Some of the 
doctors ha7e boldly made the state- 
ment that it some patients get relief 
at the hands of Hakims and Vaidyas, 
it is due to the fact that nature itself 
is a great healer. Another kind friend 
has gone so far as to say that patients 
come to doctors j when they have 
lost all hopes in the indigenous 
system!. I refute both the statemeats 
and say that here the doctors are 
wrong* In fact, tho^e who are poor 
go to free hospitals, and the others vrho 
oan afiord to spend a little, approach the 



Indian practitioners on account ot 
their trust in the indigenous systems and 
rei^ain under their treatment till cured. 
Again, those that resort in the beginning 
to the Allopathic system, place 

themselves at the hands of Vaidyas and 
Hakims when the scientific doctors, with 
all their boast of diagnosis, lail to cure 
them of their maladis. The Virtues of 
indigenous systems lie more in the 
treatment of chronic diseases than acute 
oases. Patients approach Hakims and 
Vaidyas and regain their lost health. 
And I daresay that in most of the acute 
oases Allopathic medicines have proved 
detrimental to patients. If an 
enquiry committee be appointed, ii can 
be proved that the growth of consump- 
tion in India is due chiefly to the 
Allopathic system of treatment. 

In India, being a tropical country, 
there exists a variety of fevers. In 
the Ayurveda the treatment follows 
this order: first of all the patient is to 
fast ; then, if necessary, a purgative is 
given, and no such medicine is pre- 
scribed as may suppress the fever, 
rather it is desired that the foreign 
matter, Zwhich is the cause of the 
fever, should be expelled or decreased. 
If milk is given in the beginning as 
diet, mucus is increased and the fever 
is helped to take a seat. Now, what 
the doctors do is this: purgative ,to 
begin with, then a fever mixture and 
milk diet. A patient of resisting tem- 
perament will be cured even in spite 
of this treatment, else the fever after 
this suppression either re-appears with 
great force or is well seated in the 
constitution. Then science is applied 
and the diagnosis begins. The 
patient goes down and down. 
Then all of a sudden a microscope 
detects the infection in the lungs. 
Just ask those patients under the 



treatment of the Allopathic doctors, who 
say how every day brings with it fresh 
experiment on their body. In the end 
they are advised to shift to a hill station 
where injections are given, but the 
disease retains its hold all the same. 

I put a pertinent question, why with 
the advent of Allopathy in India con- 
sumption has increased by leaps and 
bounds. My reply is that in those days 
we knew the right sort of treatment 
and now we are misguided 

I place before the doctors 

the following cases where the 
diagnosis and the uptodate science of 
the Allopaths will fail to act. A 
committee may be appointed to 
uphold or repudiate my claim. 

1. In rickets an ointment, when 
rubbed on the back of the child, will 
make small thin worms or insects come 
out. Can science prove it ? 

2. Tertain fever is oft if a medioin© 
is tied to a finger. Please prove it by 
science. 

3. A wound of a cattle, having worms^ 
ja cured and cleared of its worms, only 
if we tie a herb upon its horn. Can yoa 

^ prove it by science ? 

4. When fever is on, we apply a 
sUfma, a powder, in the right eye, 
fever of the right half is off; and whea 
apphed ia the left eye. it will leave 

jthe other half. Prove with the help 
of your science as to why it is so. 

5. We apply a surma in the eyes 
ofia patient suffering from loonorrhoea^ 
Could you explain to us how aad what 
effect has it ? 

The Ayurveda can perform sooreir 
of such miracles, but the doctors will 
not believe them. They are bent 
upon ridiculiog the system. They do 
not wish to add to their experience 
and knowledge. Dr. Franklin Leavitt 
observes honestly : ** These medical mea 
have always followed the practice of 
smiling incredulously at whatever 
that could not be interpreted after their 
own formulas. It repudiates all that 
comes to it for irregular sources. 

In my previous article I had thrown 
out my challenge to my opponents to 
appoint a committee; consisting of 
doctors, and Vaidyas and Hakims, to 



divide the "^patients of a certain disease< 
half and half, and judge tthe results 
of treatment of the respective 
ystems. Once again I repeat my 
(iiiallenge. I put to them another 
suggestion. Let the Lahore Municipal 
Committee take the work in its own 
hands. It should sanction an equal 
amount for an Allopathic and aa 
Ayurvedic free hospital a nd see, after 
one year's working, to which insti- 
tution a greater number of puientar 
went for treatment and where a greater 
number was cured. A committee oon-^ 
sisting of only impartial members should 
investigate and report. 



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HOW TO HAVE LESS 
OF CHRONIC CASES. 



D^ Clarke tor Charak. 



Mr. Satyadas Baneiji irrites frota 
CalcatU:— 

According to Dr. flarper-Nelson^ 
'* the indigenous systems of medicine 
have no pretence whatever to be in 
the slightest degree scientific, " but 
*' are founded on tradition and super- 

Ietition/' I might here refer him to> 
the observations of Dr. Clarke of 
_ Philadelphia. "If the physiciens of 
the present day would drop from the 
pharmacopoea all tne modem, 
drugs and chemicals, and treat 
their patients according to the method* 
of Charak, there would be lees work 
for the undertakers and fewer 
chronic invalids in the world ."^ 
Dr. Hirper-Nelson's accusation that 
*' the indigenous systems are without 
even the rudiments of science. They 
are lirgely based on the long- discarded 
humoral theory — that disease is due to 
the entrance of air, mucus or bile, etc.» 
to some part of the body", only afford* 
unmistakable proof of his utter igno-» 
ranee of the Ayurveda. Any Ayurvedic 
practitioner worth the ijiame' woiild# 
if the learned doctor had cared to ask 
him, have explained to him what this 
" humoral theory " of Ayurveda really 
is. The Ayurvedist believes that all 
physiological functions are controlled 
by three principles, which are called 
Datui when they are normal, and 
Do$ha8 when they are abnoroiai 
These are Yayu (th* 

motive or dynamic principlelL 
Piiia (the consuming or mrtabolic 
principle), and Kaofia (the oOoUng or 
preserving principle). The maintenano# 
of their equipoise means health, whiW 



the opposite leads to disease througM 
perversion of physiological function* 
exoept in the cases of diieases caused 
by trauma, poisoning, etc.. where th* 
disturbance comes later. I should ad^ 
vise Dr. Harper-Nelson to read th# 
admirable article on. •* The Theory of 
Tridosha or Tridhatu*\ contributetl by 
Mahamahopadhvaya Kaviraj Gananatk 
Sen, M.A., L.M.S . to the JoUfnal of 
AyurvBda, June, 1925, in which th* 
theory of Vayu, Pitta and Kapha is 
lucidly explained with quotations froia 
the original Sanskrit texts. 

1 do not deny the existence of quacks 
in this country. And how could it b^ 
otherwise when thore is only one doctor 
1 (I mean, of course. Allopath) to every 
' 43 000 of the population? But to- 
' aver that every Ayurvedic practitioner* 
is a quack would be, to quote Sam. 
Weller, saying ** that which is not the 
truth, ' but so far from it, on tho 
contrary, quite the reverse.'" 

The object of the different AyUrvedio 
colleges which have of late been . 
established in this country, is to traim 
up Kavirajes or Vaids in the tru^ 
sense of the word and thus do away 
with the evil of quacks. And a 7isit 
' to any of these institutions and aa 
examination of the mode of teaching- 
pursued there will, I dare say, convince 
anybody whose angle of vision is not 
hopelessly perverse to the good work 
they are doing. It may be mentioned 
here that so. Tie of these colleges, as 
for example, those at Madras, Patna» 
etc., are Government in-^titutions. Why 
then look aghast at the grant mad© 
by the Lahore :?j>unicipality to the Daya- 
nand Ayurvedic College as if the aot 
were an enormity ? 



EFFECTS OF WRONG 
THINKING, 



Marks on Human Fa^a 



Continued wrong thinkine of any 
kind will not only leave it tell-tale 
marks on the nervous system, but it will 
also show its traces on the huinan face. 
There are the narrow, watchful eyes ; 
the nervous, twitching mouth ; the 
TOnkled. lowered brow ; the restless 
jerk ; movements of the han Is and feet : 
all of which betray mental and sub- 
cons<»Jous states which are apt to do no 
end of damage to the body and briin. 

It is indeed astonishing how big a 
part the mind plays in our physical 
* \ condition. For instance. when some 
severe illness comes, its efiects Upon us 
are largely determined by our mental 
and subconscious attitude, according as 
it is one of confidence or fear. In the 
latter case it may actuallv mean the 
difference between life and death. 

The mental and emotional state may 
have much to do with the onset of di- 
sease Casting back in memory through 
the long list of those who came to me 
for advice and help I recall several who 
had some great mental and emotional 
shock shortly before their trouble made 
its appearance. There are millions of 
so-called intelligent men and women 
who lay the foundation of some of the 
worst diseases known to mankind by 
yielding perpetually to violent emotion, 
and impiUses ; to anger, fear, worry^j 
hatred and revenge. —Psychology^ 







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I.A bioth]6rapie 

3, Rue Maublanc 
PARIS (XV^. 



Sole Agent for India G. LOUCAIOS 

Shusthary Building 

IS A, Elphinstone Circle 

BOMBAY. 



' BfUVACClN " 

Antityphoid Tablets 
-with Vegetable Bile 

Prepared according to the researches 
of Profcisor BESREDKA 



Subcutaneous injections against typhoid constitute the process of 
vaccination which is best known to the public. Unfortunately, the 
iniections. which ar alwavs painful, are often followed hv discomfort, 
5omf;times e^en by serious accidents. 

That is why a more practical process has been sought in order to 
populari^ce antityphoid vaccination. The same was realized by the 
method of vaccination through the mouth which has proved efficacious 
and inoffensive. 

FORMULA : Eac^ oWon«r pill con»ain« 0,2 g. mixture of : 

~~"~~~~~~~~~" Aloes. BoWo powder. Boldo extract. Evonymine. Taurocolate 

and GJycocolntc o' Sodium, Soap. (The pills for children contain 

0,1 e. of the same mixture). 



E»cl» tnWet contain* ; 

17 mr. Eberth Bacilli, 17 ms. Para-A, 17 mjj. Para-B, heat-killed 
and dessica^ed. which repretenfa from 60 to 70 billions of 
trV'-obes in each tablet. 



METHOD EMPLOYED : 

For ariults an<^ children over 7 years of age : 

1* Take on an emoty stomach one oblong pill of 
vegetable bile- A quarter of an hour after take one tablet 
of vaccine. Food can be taken one hour after ingestion of 
the vaccine- 

2 Repeat the same operation the two following 
mornings. 

For chiHren under 7 years of age : 
(special doses) 

1" Take on empty stomach two oblong pills of vege- 
table bile. A quarter of an hour after take ons tablet of 
vaccine. 

2° Repeat the same operation the following morning. 



y\\fi immunisation is then comqieet and almost immediate 

The immunity acquired lasts for at least one year 
INlo speolal dlot meceassary 

THE TABLETS IN BOXES KEEP INDEFINITELY 



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FA BOERICKE.M.D. 



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BCDlEIlSnOfflE iS^TAFIElL , 

RECEIVED THE ONLY 

PRIZE MEDALS 

-p,, ;r AWARDED 

HOMOEOPATHIC 
PREPARATIONS 

THREE GREAT AMERICAN 
ec WORLD FAIRS 
CENTENNIAL EXPOSITION 

^e-j. PHILADELPHIA 1076 

COTTON EXPOSITION 

NEW ORLEANS 1884 5 

COLLIMBIAN EXPOSinOlM 

CHICAGO 1893 




(J3ff/£fe''0f. 







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• AND 
PUBL/SHERS 



A.JTAFEL 



PHILADELPHIA 

101 1 ARCH ST 
•' '29 S,7T"ST-i^.i>^- 
NEW YORK ' 

109 W-48''t' STREET 
CHICAGO i s 

:,- 21 1 N. STATE ST. 

PITTSBURGH 

135 SEVENTH ST. 

NCINNATIV^^-i- 

3 WEST FOURTH ST. 



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January 29, 1929' 



Mr* Richard B. Gregg, 
c/o Mr. Ordway Tead, 
56 Groton bt . 
Forest Hills Gardens, 
Long 261^nd, N. Y. 



Dear Sir:- 

We have your favor of January 25th and take 
pleasure ir mailing you under separate cover our several 
pamphlets on our (Tissue Remedies and Homoeopathic preparations. 

We have a small flat case containing the Twelve 
Tissue Remedies put up in tablet form costing $3.00 plus 
postage and a condensed took on these remedies by Dr. Anshutz 
for #1.25. We also have a case holding 18 of the most used 
Homoeopathic remedies with directions for use. This case is 
filled with pellets costing #3.00 plus postage. The names of 
a few good Homoeopathic Physicians in Boston are as follows:- 

Dr. H. L. Houghton, 
176 Oommonwealth Ave. 

and 

Dr. Elizabeth Wright, 
472 Commonwealth Ave. 



As for the Homoeopathic Pharmacy in Boston, we know of but one 
Messrs. Otis Glapp & Son. In reference to our remedies would 

state that we sell these at retail as per prices given in the 
price list sent you. Thanking you for your favor and hoping 
to receive your orders, we remain 



FAD:W 



Yours very^ *^r^J 



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AND FOOD MANUAL 



(FEBRUARY) 



Page 163 



Sunday BREAKFAST February 5 

Egg Rolls Maple or Honey Lettuce Coffee 

Egg Rolls: Ingredients: 

IC whole wheat flour 1 egg yolk 

KC of white flour IC of milk 

3 level t of BP IT of butter 

Mix thoroughly the Whole Wheat and white flours, 
add baking powder. Rub in butter. To the milk add 
the yolk of the egg, beaten light. Make into a soft 
dough. Roll very thin with white flour, using a 
large round cutter. Butter top, fold over, brush the 
top with butter and bake in 350° oven about 25m. 



LUNCHEON 

Cottage Cheese Salad 

Sliced Apples with Honey and Cream 

Salad: Mix together lightly IC of minced cab- 
bage, HC chopped celery, 6 green onions, IT minced 
green peppers. Mash smooth lib of cottage cheese 
and >^C cream. Add to the above mixture. Serve 
on lettuce with or without dressing. Makes 4 large 
portions. 



Monday 
Pears 



BREAKFAST February 6 

Home Made Buttermilk 



Buttermilk: To Iqt of whole milk in shallow 
crock, add juice of 1 lemon. Cover with cheese-cloth. 
Let stand in fairly warm place until it clabbers. The 
time depends on freshness of milk and temperature 
of room, but usually the milk will be ready for break- 
fast if put to set the night before. Beat until frothy 
with large Dover egg-beater. This makes delicious 
"buttermilk" and is very nutritious and wholesome. 
In our kitchens we have several milk-crocks, and a 
quart jar with the fitted beater. In many department 
stores small churns on the same order can be bought 
at small cost. The milk is easily made and can be 
taken by those who have an atitipathy for sweet 
milk. The lemon adds a valuable vitamin. 



LUNCHEON 

Duck Hash Celery Hearts Fruit Salad 

Hash: Cut in large pieces the remaining meat 

on duck. To the gravy add yolks of 2 eggs. Pour 

over meat. Cover with layer of corn and cook in 

350° oven until thoroughly heated. 

Salad : Equal parts of oranges, pineapple, grapes. 



DINNER 
Duck Corn Onion Rings Endive Salad 
Russian Dressing Stuffed Oranges 

Duck: Scrub thoroughly inside and out. Dry. 
Fill with cooked dehydrated corn. Put in roasting 
pan, breast sides up. Cover with bacon. Cook in 
475° oven until slightly brown. Slice I large onion 
and place in pan, with 2C of boiling water, 2T of 
lemon juice. Cover pan and cook until tender. 
This requires from Ihr to IKhrs. Serve in bed of 
cooked corn, garnish with parsley. The onion rings 
may be placed on same platter if desired. 

Onions: Remove skins from medium size onions. 
Cut in very thin slices. Grease hot Super-Maid broiler 
with butter. Cook onions till light brown, separating 
them into rings while cooking. 

Salad: Wipe leaves with damp cloth. Serve 
with dressing (page 125, No. 5). Add minced ripe 
ohves, both red and green peppers, cucumber. 
Omit onions. 

Oranges: Peel and divide into sections but do 
not separate. Put oranges into sherbet glasses, 
using one for each service. Fill with red pitted 
chernes and serve with fruit sauce made of cherry 
juice, cream and honey. 

Order of Work: Cook corn. Prepare duck. 
While duck is cooking prepare and cook onions 
make salad, stuff oranges. 



Spinach in Croustades Carrots Peas 

Date Loaf Cake 

Spinach: Cut the crust from top and sides of a 
small oblong loaf of whole wheat bread, making 
a brick-shape piece. Brush over the sides with 
melted butter, and then place in a hot oven, and, one 
by one, brown the sides until crisp and the color 
of well-browned toast. Now remove the crumb from 
the inside, using a sharp French paring knife to cut it 
around the sides, forming an oblong box with walls 
not more than one-fourth an inch in thickness. Fill 
with cooked spinach, chopped and seasoned with 
bacon. Pack well into box. 

Carrots: Scrub carrots and cut in Kin slices. 
Cook about 15m in cooker at 151bs pressure. In a 
heavy aluminum saucepan put 2T butter, '/iT each 
minced onion and parsley, and a dash of nutmeg. 
Add carrots and turn over and over until thoroughly 
covered with mixture. Line the sides of a baking 
dish with carrots and put peas in center. 

Peas: Drain can of peas. In sauce pan put 2T 
butter, KT mint. Proceed as if carrots, and when 
heated thoroughly combine as directed. 

Cake: Cream KC butter. Add }4C honey, and 
the well-beaten yolks of 3 eggs. Sift together 2C of 
whole wheat flour 4t BP. Add to first mixture 
alternately with yiC luke-warm water. Lastly, stir 



Page 164 



(FEBRUARY) 



in lib of sun ripened dates, stoned, chopped and 
floured, and It of vanilla extract. Bake in a greased 
and floured pan for about 40m in 300° oven. 

Order of Work: The cake may be baked on 
Saturday. Prepare vegetables. Cook. Make 
croustade. Fill. 



80/20 COOK BOOK SERVICE 

Compote: Use equal parts apple and pineapple. 

Sauce: Cook together 2C maple syrup, IC cream 
until it forms a soft ball when tried m water' 
Pour over compote. 

Order of Work: Make sauce. Cook eggs. Corn 
Cauliflower. Make compote. 



Tuesday BREAKFAST February 7 

Apples Milk 



LUNCHEON 



Rice 



Asparagus Salad 

Rice: Pur a cup of washed rice in a clean salt 
bag, tie securely at the top, allowing plenty of room 
for rice to swell. Drop bag in boiling water and keep 
boiling for Ihr. Then empty into hot dish and serve 
at once. The rice will absorb all the water and the 
grains will be tender and plump. Served with a sauce 
made of 8oz of D.-D. L. sugar and 4 oz of butter, 
creamed thoroughly and flavored with nutmeg, it 
is a delicious dessert. 

Salad: Place lettuce leaves on plate. Arrange 
asparagus tips on lettuce, radiating from the center, 
with tips at outer edge. In center of plate, arrange 
a mound of tiny spinach leaves, surrounded by 
grated carrots. Between the tips place radish roses, 
and ripe olives. Serve with any dressing, made with 
natural sweetening. 



DINNER 

Soup Caulifllower and Egg Yolks 

Corn with Peppers Relishes Fruit Compote 

Maple Sugar Sauce 

Soup: Use any juices on hand adding milk, 
Savita and Sea Lettuce to taste. 

Cauliflower: Remove outside leaves and wash 
thoroughly. Cook leaves and save for soup; cauli- 
flower in top pan, in pressure cooker, at 151bs about 
15m. If leaves are nice they can be cooked, chopped 
fine and be used for a nest for cauliflower. Cover 
with 2 hard cooked egg yolks, sliced, 2t minced 
parsley and a dash of paprika. ' 

Corn: Ingredients — Service for 4: 
4C dehydrated corn 
Water to cover Kin above corn. 
Method: Cover corn. Let stand about 30m. 
Place in pressure cooker and cook 20m at 151bs 
pressure. Add KC of milk and cream, half and half, 
IT butter and KC minced green peppers. Cook in 
oven at 400° until brown, about 20m. 



Wednesday BREAKFAST February 8 

Corn Cream 

Corn: Use D.-D. L. dehydrated corn. Run 
through grinder until like coarse meal. Serve raw 
with cream. May be combined with any fruits 
Makes and excellent breakfast— particularly good 
for those suffering with constipation. 



Vegetable Plate Celery Sauce Raspberries 

Plate: Use any vegetables on hand. Mix to- 
gether 2T butter, IC milk and add IC chopped 
raw celery. To this mixture add yolks of 3 eggs, 
IT onion juice. Put in oval baking dish and bake 
30m m 350° oven. Remove and serve on platter 
with any desired vegetables as border. Onion and 
beans or peas and carrots make a very satisfactory 
combination and an attractive platter. 

Raspberries: Use D.-D. L. raspberries. Serve 
with cream and honey. Delicious. 



DINNER 

Parsnips Peas Asparagus Kraut Salad 

Pear-Cherry Compote 

Parsnips: Scrub and cut lengthwise but do not 
scrape— 21bs of parsnips. Cook in pressure cooker 
15m at 151bs pressure. Remove. Scrape. Place 
in baking dish. Dot with butter, add KC cream. 
Bake in 400° oven till slightly brown. Delicious. 

Peas: 

Asparagus: 

Salad : To 2C of kraut add KT minced cucumber 
1 large tomato and 2T sour cream dressing. Mix 
lightly together and serve on lettuce. 

Compote: Use one-half pear for each service. 
Fill with cherries or any other small fruit. Serve 
in sherbet glasses. 

Order of Work: Prepare vegetables. Cook. 
Make salad. Make compote. 



Defensive -Diet League of America 

DEPARTMENT FOR PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS' BULLETIN 



\ 



K-v^ No. ■ 65 

CHANGING FCX)D HABITS 



CHICAGO, Feb. 27. — Diet propaganda is raising hob with the meat 
business. Packers and stockmen are again facing a slump in beef. Prices 
of beef cattle have dropped about $4 a 1 00 pounds. Everett C. Brown, 
President of the Chicago Livestock Exchange, estimates that there has 
been a shrinkage of $1 ,375,000,000 in the value of livestock of the country 
in the last six months. 

The demand for beef, owing to high prices during the last year, has 
been so curtailed that consumption in some sections is 25 per cent, under 
normal. Some experts assert that markets are clogged with beef which 
cannot be sold, and that consumers still have to pay high priceSy and to 
this they attribute the drop in the prices of hides. 

A great change in diet on the part of the public is in progress. An 
authority in the Packers' Institute says the people of this country eat 
45 per cent, less meat than ten years ago. At the same time consump- 
tion of salads has increased 1 1 per cent. Pastry has dropped off in 
consumption 25 per cent., white bread 20 per cent, and potatoes 15 
per cent. 

Items of diet which have increased are: Ice cream, 70 per cent.; 
malted milk, 63 per cent.; whole milk, 62 per cent.; fresh fruit, 39 per 
cent.; fresh vegetables and whole wheat bread, 35 per cent.; cereals, 
34 per cent.; canned fruit, 33 per cent.; poultry, 25 per cent., and eggs, 
1 1 per cent. These figures are compiled from a survey of restaurant 
and hotel records. 

The various salads have almost run roast beef off the table. — N. Y. 

World, Feb. 28, 1929. 

* * * * 

The consumption of denatured sugar, granulated, loaf and pulver- 
ized, is also away below the average, estimated by some writers, who 
are supposed to have inside information, as high as 500,000 lbs. 

While there is much encouragement in this report, there is still plenty 
of work for the League. Note the tremendous increase in consumption 
of ice cream, (70%), of malted milk, (63%); cereals, (34%). None of 
these foods are "natural," and there should be a reduction rather than 
an increase. If there had been an increase in the use of potatoes 
rather than of wheat bread, even of the whole-grain variety, I should 
have been better pleased. 

Still, taken as a whole, I am quite well satisfied, particularly as I 
knoiv that these changes in eating habits are fundamental and not due 
in any great part to the pzissing fad for extreme slenderness. 



From the very beginning of my public work, I have insisted that 
most people eat ten times too much bread, at least five times too much 
meat, and several hundred times too much sugar. All these have their 
place at present, but it is one of diminishing importance, and certainly 
is not at every meal and in every conceivable combination. Once per 
day bread may be eaten to advantage, perferably at noon, and every 
crumb of it must be well chewed and completely soaked with the 
fluid formed in the mouth for the purpose of digesting starches and so 
far as we know no other food. And remember these things: 

Do not eat any kind of tart fruit with bread. 

Do not eat bread that has been soaked in milk, water, fruit juice or 
any other fluid. 

Do not eat bread with any kind of these foods: Meat, poultry, fish, 
game. The taking of bread and meat into the mouth at the same time 
and chewing them together is particularly to be avoided. Either the 
meat will be chewed too much or the bread not enough. If your diges- 
tion is very good, you may eat a little bread, after you have taken your 
meat and vegetables, provided you chew, chew and chew it, so long as 
you can find anything to chew. 

Chew bread until it becomes fluid in the mouth, about like heavy 
cream, or thick soup. If you will do that you may take almost any 
other kind of food at the same meal; but do not mix up a lot of foods 
with the bread in the mouth. 

1 do not seriously object to bread-and-cheese, at the same time, be- 
cause hoth must be chewed to creamy consistency before they are 
swallowed. But it is better, because it is safer, to take cheese with 
uncooked fruits and raw green vegetables than with any other food, and 
the flavor of both is greatly improved by such combination. 

You are referred to previous Bulletins, particularly No. 38, for ad- 
ditional suggestions and reasons why. 

* ♦ * « 

1 know a family of three adults and one servant, who, before coming 
into the League, bought one 100-pound bag of sugar and about 25 
pounds in small lots each year. Just the other day the man of the house 
told me that for three years their total consumption of sugar had not 
averaged 20 pounds per year. All members of that family are satisfied 
with their weight, and sugar has not been avoided in an effort to "re- 
duce." He added that when they did buy sugar it was not because 
they wanted it, but "just to have it in the house for guests"; and that it 
usually dried out and caked before use. This particular family uses 
around 30 pounds of honey each year! 



It U encouraging to those of us who have failed to become athletic 
prize winners to know that the general opinion of the medical profession 
is that the physically undeveloped are quite as apt, if not more apt, 
to reach old age. Tliis does not mean that physical training is not good, 
and that every one should not have a certain amount of training in 
that line, but it does mean that over-training is also a menace to life 



when any one form is chosen to the exclusion of others. As a matter of 
fact very few famous athletes ever reach the scriptural age of three 
score and ten. This is encouraging, especially to those who may be 
middle-of-the-roaders. — Living Tissue. 



CANCER! CANCER!! CANCER!!! 

The cancer death-rate increased from an average of 74)4 per hundred 
thousand in 1 906 to the alarming total of 1 1 4)4 per hundred thousand 
in 1926 — and this in the face of constant study and investigation. On 
this subject the following, from a report of Frederick D. Hoffman, 
L.L.D., Statistician, Prudential Insurance Co. of America, should be 
of startling interest to everybody concerned with the future welfare of 
our American people: 

"The cancer problem will never be solved by discussion. We have a 
vast amount of more cancer at the present time than thirty years ago in 
proportion to the population. The increase in cancer has been real and 
not merely seeming. The progress which has been made in the diagnosis 
of cancer in its early stages has not affected the death-rate at all. 

"It goes without saying that the cancer problem must find its ex- 
planation in alterations in our modern mode of living as compared or con- 
trasted with the more natural mode of living in former years. This con- 
clusion is emphasized by a study of cancer in native races, which 
almost invariably shows that cancer among primitive people is exceedingly 
rare in contrast to the extraordinary frequency among the more highly 
civilized races. Discovery after discovery is announced, now as to 
causation, now as to treatment, but all leave the subject as confused 
and complicated as ever, and no actual results accomplished. 

"The vast amount of laboratory research on the one hand and of 
cancer propaganda on the other seems to have had no measurable effect 
on the cancer death rate. The enormous sums of money which are 
expended on cancer research seem to have yielded thus far not a frag- 
ment of evidence of real value towards the control and cure of cancer. 
The more thoroughly one is familiar with the situation and the more 
disinterested one is as regards methods to be followed, the more one 
becomes convinced of the utter futility of most of the methods, at present 
followed, which rest chiefly upon incessant claims for money and more 
money, instead of upon more and more unselfish devotion to the under- 
lying facts and conditions that thus far have baffled human intelligence 
throughout the world. 

"Statistical research offers clues not necessarily to a cause or a cure, 
but chiefly to the direction in which more specialized research may 
employ itself to best advantage. At the present time, a glance back- 
ward upon the last ten years certainly justifies no other conclusion 
than that we are apparently not on the right track as likely to yield 

results of far-reaching value. 

* * * * 

"In this statement, we find the same tenor of expression made by all 
scientists upon their findings regarding the increase in cancer. Ap- 
parently not one particle of value has been added by the science of 



medicine, as to the cause or th^ cure of cancer. We do not know by 
what process a local irritation becomes a cancer, but we can prevent 
local irritation in the intestinal tract by avoiding food substances that 

produce it." 

* * * * 

In simple language, we can prevent cancer by understanding foods 
and their effects, and by applying this knowledge to the correct selec- 
tion, proportion, combination and preparation of our common, every- 
day foods. 

If we cannot yet cure cancer, we can prevent it. So far as known, 
nobody is exempt. Anybody may have it, who supplies the necessary 
conditions by following eating habits that are now known to be harmful. 

So far as life-saving results are concerned, Sir, W. A. Lane, London, 
is as nearly right as anybody when he says: "There is no known cure 

for cancer. Prevention is not difficult and seems to be our only hope." 

* * * * 

We have arrived at the conviction that though there are many pos- 
sible exciting causes of cancer it can only attack a body where the soil 
has been prepared for it by chronic food poisoning and vitamin starva- 
tion. 

If it appears to be more common in old age or physical decline it is 
because advanced years are needed to give the cumulative effect of 
chronic poisoning its critical results. If the blood is poisoned or starved 
of the elements which the body requires for health, the tissues must 
degenerate and be readier to break down. 

Cancer never begins in a healthy organ or a healthy tissue, and tissue 
will not break down from within as long as it is fed with pure blood. 
The increase of chronic blood-poisoning may be traced to the immense 
and continuing increase in the public consumption of unnatural foods. 

* * * * 

The best way of avoiding tuberculosis, cancer, and many other 
diseases, does not lie in discovering new serums and drugs which may 
do more harm than good, but lies in the strengthening of our bodies. 
A perfectly healthy man may breathe in tuberculosis germs every day, 
but he will not get tuberculosis. His body eliminates or destroys these 
germs. Mingling with people suffering from various diseases, his body 
will receive disease germs without number, which, however, will fail 
to bring about disease. 



INFLUENCE OF ORANGE JUICE 
The numerous reports of the favorable infuence of oranges on the 
development of children have for some time been a puzzle to the labor- 
atory investigator. What is it that oranges really do to the child's 
body? When Newell and Miller at Iowa State College, added about an 
ounce and a half of orange juice daily for three months to the other- 
wise unchanged diet of fourteen underweight children, they found 
decided improvement in their rate of gain. The children's weight in- 
creased 146 per cent of the expected gain, with the oranges, in contrast 



to only forty-six per cent, observed in the three months previous. 
In California, Cheney fed an orange a day to a group of malnourished 
children and kept as control a similar group without oranges. During 
two different periods of two months each the children eating the fruit 
gained on the average 141 and 118 F>er cent, above the expected in- 
creases and control group only twenty-eight and eighteen per cent. 

above. 

* * * * 

The increase in weight wais striking for the few days of the experiment. 
During the non-orange juice periods, including the preliminary days, 
the children gained on the average at the rate of 0.08 pounds per day; 
but with the oranges at the rate of 0.30 pounds — approximately four 
times as much with the fruit as without. That the favorable effect 
w£is not due primarily to added calories is shown by the fact that the 
larger addition of calories from the Home diet to the experimental 
diet did not bring about such change. There seems to be no doubt 
that the oranges caused increase in weight. 

What is it in the orange juice that causes these favorable effects^ 
At present only guessing answers can be given to the question. How- 
ever, we have four suggestions to offer. 

The vitamin content is one possibility. Oranges have been shown to 
contain vitamins A, B and C. It has been demonstrated that both A 
and B slightly increase mineral retention; and it also has been proved 
that the stimulus to the growth of babies which is observed with in- 
creased orange juice was due to the vitamin B, for when the orange juice 
was so treated as to remove B, the growth stimulating effect was not 
observed. The potency of the anti-scorbutic vitamin in oranges is 
well known; Sherman goes so far as to say that "better growth, higher 
stamina, and better general health and disposition are indicated by the 
feeding of vitamin C in the form of orange or tomato juice." 

It must be remembered that the vitamin that prevents rickets has 
not been demonstrated to be in oranges. Indeed children have rickets 
even when taking oranges. 

Another possible explanation of the action of the oranges is the fact 
that they add a small amount of the minerals to the diet, bringing 
them a little nearer to the needed quantities. Sherman and Hawley 
found that their children retained more calcium on a generous allow- 
ance than on a meager quantity, but the mere presence of the extra 
quantity in the orange cannot be the only cause of the favorable action. 

Another suggestions seems very probably to be of significance — the 
alkalin action of the oranges after digestion. The original diet 
with the large amount of cereal, the meat, and the small amount of 
vegetable gave a decidedly acid result, but the addition of the oranges 
changed this to an alkalin one. The difference was so marked as to 
shift the reaction of the urine from decidedly acid to decidedly alkalin. 
Numerous observers have found that a diet with an acid residue, 
whether from the food itself or from added mineral acid, causes a greater 
excretion of minerals than one with an alkalin residue. It therefore 



seems highly probably that this alkalinizing effect of the oranges is at 
least a very important factor in bringing about the increased reten- 
tion of minerals and nitrogen. 

Whether or not the complete explanation of the value of the fruit 
involves one or all of these possibilities, the fact remains that the 
oranges brought increased gain in weight in these children, and greater 
retention of important minerals and nitrogen. — Western Dietitian. 



IF YOU MUST EAT DRIED BEANS AND PEAS— 

Young peas are tender and sweet, very palatable, very easily digested 
and highly gJkalin. Old dried peas (and beans) cannot be properly 
softened by boiling, but become harder and tougher the longer they 
are boiled. 

The usual method of cooking dried beans and peas is thoroughly 
bad — viz., steeping them in water overnight, and then boiling them in 
water to which soda has been added. The skins remain tough and in- 
digestible, and the soda destroys vitamins. 

Dried peas and beans can be better cooked in a pressure-cooker; 
canned beans are dry-baked and cooked under pressure, and hence 
are digestible, if eaten with a suitable amount of offsetting food, such 
as cellulose or roughage, such as onions and other raw green stuffs. 

The only other ways to render dried beans and peas digestible are 
(1) to roast them dry for two hours at a low temp)erature (keeping them 
moving by fairly frequent shaking of baking dish), and then boiling 
them; and (2) germinating them. 

Germination is the better way for ordinary households, and is quite 
simple in the summer time. The peas or beans should be moistened, 
spread over a piece of damp felt (such as is put under carpets) and kept 
at a temperature of approximately 75° Fah. for two to three days. 
If the temperature falls, the germination will take a little longer. Over 
the dish of germinating peas a cloth or felt should also be spread — to 
keep out light; that is, the conditions must be approximated to those 
given to seeds being grown in the ground. 

Fresh germinated jDeas are a valuable source of vitamins, and require 
to be boiled for only a few minutes (5 to 10 minutes at most); they 
are then soft and appetizing. They should be served with savoury 
dishes. The longer the peas are allowed to germinate, the longer the 
"shoots." When these shoots have grown 2 inches or more they can 
be broken off and boiled for two or three minutes, and served like 
asparagus, or they can be used raw for salads. 

Care should be taken not to put too much water on the germinating 
peas — just a sprinkling two or three times a day; they should be kept 
damp, but not wet and sloppy. It is a good plan to have a wooden 
frame and stretch the felt across this, and make allowance for a little 
drainage on the germinating table. The chief factors are: the presence 
of moisture, the absence of light, and correct temperature without 
much variation night or day. — New Health, London. 

6 



MAKE FOODS TEMPTING 

Although, we may plan of an adequate diet, it may be useless, 
simply because the food so provided fails to attract the individual and 
to stir his appetite. 

It is here that the psychological factor enters. Merely to supply 
adequate protein, minerals, accessory factors and roughage, is not 
enough; for the influence of the psychological factor is both subtle and 
profound. 

Everyone knows that the sight and smell, as well as the anticipation 
and taste of wholesome food, attractively prepared, are able to act as 
powerful stimulants on both the flow of the saliva and the gastric juices. 
At the mere thought of attractive food, we say the mouth waters. 
Food which is thus enjoyed will always do more good than that which is 
unattractive and unappetizing. 

Pleasant sensations promote the flow of gastric juice, and thus 
heighten appetite and improve digestion. But distressful emotions, 
such as worry, nerve strain, anxiety and fear, should be avoided as 
much as possible, because they decrease gastric secretion and thus 
hinder digestion. On the other hand, a happier frame of mind, eissisted 
by the serving of food in a neat and attractive form, encourages diges- 
tion, and gives the wonderful human machine the opportunity it deserves 
to do the best with the best of food. 



GEMS OF WISDOM 

Following are a few short, snappy sentences copied from "Middle 
Age and Old Age," by Dr. Leonard Williams, London. I hope every 
reader will take them "home" and remember them: 

"The preservation of health is a duty. Few seem conscious that 
there is such a thing as physical morality." 

"When the average man has ignorantly sown the seeds of disease 
and begins to reap its necessary harvest in suffering, he calls upon 
some fetish to perform the miracle of deliverance. He is only beginning 
dimly to realize that disease and premature death are merely the logical 
outcome of causes which he can himself control, and that no miracle 
can deliver him from the results, so long as he persists in cultivating 
the causes. He has learnt to babble that prevention is better than 
cure, but has yet to realize that prevention is everything and cure noth- 
ing." 

(Please take note that Dr. Williams is a very prominent English 
medical doctor, as well as a very honest one). 

"The battle for fresh air may be counted as won, but there remains 
a very formidable array of ignorance, prejudice and commercial interests, 
which combine to oppose all progress in other equally obvious direc- 
tions." 

"The theory that it is the proper duty of the physician to enable 
people to sin without suffering still seems to rule even in the institu- 
tions of scientific learning; and students are taught not how disease 

7 



may be prevented and cured by natural and rational modes of i 
ing and eating foods, but how symptoms may be relieved by c 

"The idea that food huiUl.s up or keeps up the strength lead 
manner of excess both in health and disease, and leaves as of no i 
the exhausting labor to which the body is condemned by the pr|t 
which the idea implies." 

"More people have been floated into their coffins on floods « 
tea and milk than ever arrive there by the ravages of disease 

"It seems strange that the 'Lord of creation' should be th 
animal who does not know how to select his food. He has 1< 
instinct for self preservation. He is not only ignorant but seems o 
to remain so. " 

"Man must give up the cooked and concentrated foods whic 
led to his undoing and return to the cultivation of those kindl> 
of the earth for which he thanks the Lord on Sunday and releg 
the back seat in the conduct of the dietary of his daily life." 

(To be continued.) 



CALIFORNIA ORANGES— Scientifically grown and tree- 
Guaranteed 8 parts sugar to 1 pert acid, packed 200-216-252 to t 
Price per box, $4.25. You pay express charges — $2.50 to Sail 
City, $3.50 to Kansas City as examples. Send orders at once 
Frederick A. Bricker, Hollywood Security Bldg., Hollywooc 
fornia. Dr. Bricker is the man who first suggested such an orj 
tion as the League, and one of its earliest members 

MAPLE SYRUP — We can supply a small quantity of excellen 
ity this spring at $3.75 per gallon, prepaid by express. Send or< 
the League please. 

WHOLE GRAIN FOODS — Members should write for I 
prices to Great Valley Mills, Paoli, Pa. Owned by a membi 
Richard Haughton. Every grain guaranteed. 



DEFENSIVE-DIET LEAGUE OF AMERICA 

619-620 Spitzer Bldg., Toledo, Ohio. 

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prestige and influence of the Farm Board 
ir^the cotton belt. 



STATES & CITIES 

Live-at-Home ^ 

To combat agricultural depression and ff 
the hand-to-mouth cash crop system, | 
North Carolina has for months been con- 1 
ducting what its able Governor Oliver Max 'f 
Gardner calls a "Live-at-Home" campaign. { 
The economic theory behind this program 
is that the home-hving husbandman raises 
his own food and feed, patronizes local 
production plants, reduces his dependence 
upon extrastate sources of supply. A 
prime feature of the campaign was an 
essay contest among 800,000 North Car- 
olina school children. Last week Governor 
Gardner closed the competition by award- 
ing prizes in the House of Representatives. 

Before him, crowded cheek to jowl, sat 
whites and blacks, men and women, boys 
and girls, for the "Live-at-Home" move- 
ment included Negroes. Newsmen re- 
marked with astonishment upon the sudden 
evaporation of race prejudice. Negroes 
spoke from the same rostrum as Governor 
Gardner about the "recovery of their race's 
self-respect." Declared Governor Gardner: 

"This is an important day in North 
Carolina history — the date of the Declara- 
tion of Independence of North Carolina 
agriculture. . . . The 'Live-at-Home' idea 
is not a fad. We have already gotten out 
of the sentimental stage of talking about 
it. Already its results are apparent. . . ." 

! a Divine Scientist. 



15J 



tags of labels for Information relative 
to purity. The seed law does not pro- 
hibit the sal" of jjoor seed, but does re- 
ure thatrm se e^jn^belari t^how 




) 



Babies Bom in ^^emberl 
Hold Record for Survival 

Explanation Found in Mothers' 
Diet, Say Health Officials 

SPRINGFIELD, 111., July 2 (UP) — 
Babies born in September enjoy the 
greatest chance of survival, according 
to the State Department of Health 
which reports it finds that 10 per cent 
of the children born in January perish 
during infancy, while only 7 per cent 
of the September arrivals succumb 

The explanation, the department 
states, lies in the fact that prospective 
mothers eat more foods, rich in vita- 
mins, during the summer because veg- 
etables are plentiful and cheap. 

Canary Bird 'Personal Baggage' 






ir 



jLKjtiJX, 



^^^^Jddtfi, 



First published in 1926. 

JOURNAL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
LETTERS. Vol. XIX. (University of 
Calcutta.) 9^X6i. Calcutta University Press. 

MEDICAL 

SYMBIOSIS. The Cure of Cancer and of 

" Selectionitis." A new orientation of the 

science of life. By H. Reinheimer. 7iX5, 249 

pp. Daniel. 7s. 6d. n. 

Mr. Reinheimer has written several books on 

"Svmbiosis," its evolutional significance, and its 

bearing on cancer. In the present work he further 

develops his views. 

MTT TT A1>V 




Tree Ripe 

Glasses of En 



. , There's Energy in 
M.I Grapefruit Juice 



Beca 



use 



(1) The citrus acid of tree ripened Grapefruit Juice 
replaces depleted gastric juices and helps 
acidify the food in the stomach thus minimizing 
the energy absorbed by digestion. 

(2) Tree ripened Grapefruit Juice is readily assimi- 
lated through the intestinal wall and supplies 
excellent and easy fuel for the inner fires of the 
body. 

(3) Tree ripened Grapefruit Juice leaves an alkali 
ash which united with any foreign acids (due to 
decomposition) accumulating in the blood, 
forms a harmless neutral compound easily elimi- 
nated. This cures acidosis. 

(4) Tree ripened Grapefruit Juice supplies Vitamines 
B and C. Tests with whole schools of chil- 
dren in California proved that children who 
received a daily 10 A. M. glass of citrus juice, 
developed better and faster than a similar 
group who received their 10 A. M. glass of milk. 

These are some of the reports of recent scientific 
investigations and account for the benefits derived 



from Grapefruit Juice. Thousands of 

21 men and women have acquired a new 
/ feeling of super abundant vitality and 
/ good spirits after drinking Grapefruit 
' Juice. Children and even babies thrive 
when it is part of their daily diet. Grape- 
fruit Juice has peculiar and necessary 
organic salts which build health with 
absolute certainty. 

For keen mind, bright eyes, clear skin, agile muscle 
and cheerful disposition drink Florida Gold tree 
ripened Grapefruit Juice regularly. 



Easy to Serve 



Florida Gold Grapefruit Juice is Pure Juice ready 
to serve. 

As a breakfast appetizer it is perfect — ^just enough 
tang — because it is made from tree ripened fruit and 
contains all of the yalues of fresh fruit without the 
labor and waste. 
Ev^ry can serves three. 

Many housewives use Florida Gold Grapefruit 
Juice to create attractive and delicious new menus. 
Every can of Florida Gold Grapefruit Juice con- 
tains the Pure juice of tree ripened grapefruit, 
picked at the height of the season and sealed 
immediately. 

This makes every season, — grapefruit season for 
you. 



nuoty cases tney ao inu wiuioui 
prospect of gain. 



lLTH I 



LIFE AND HEA 

TWENTIETH CENTURY HEALTH 
SCIENCE. By John X. Lough- 
ran. 217 pp. New York: World 
Health League. $3. I t 3 9 

rJ this small book pujalished under 
the auspices of the World Health 
League a system is expounded 
that teaches the acquirement of 
youth and health through nutrition. 
It cannot be said to be a system of 
fads. It dwells more particularly 
on the food values of sunlight, the 
mineral salts as cell builders, the 
magic of the five vitamins (with an 
explanatory chart of their proper- 
ties), the enemies of life as exem- 
plified in refined sugars, ice cream, 
white flour products, meat, tea and 
coffee, regeneration of eyes and 
teeth, facts regarding cancer and 
tuberculosis. Apparently "every 
pathological condition is funda- 
mentally a nutritive one." Cancer, 
the rapidly advancing shadow on 
the path of middle age. is a disease 
of civilization. There is absolutely 
no principle limiting life. "Investi- 
gators in the study of living cells 
have revealed the strange fact that 
imder the most ideal surroundings 
and when receiving proper nutri- 
tion, cells are relatively immortal 
• • • and no scientist has ever yet 
been able to advance a fundamental 
reason for death." Dr. Robert Mc- 
Carrlson, a famous food scientist 
on the staff of the British Army 
Medical Service in India, declares 
that among the natives he examined 
were some that were over 300 years 
of age; and he substantiated these 
records which the British Govern- 
ment has since accepted as genuine. 
Apparently it is up to human beings 
whether or not they will live for- 
ever. The ideas of diet in this 
volume may help them to it. Apart 
from the fact that no man wishes 
to die, none willingly grows old. 

OROANTZED. GIVING 



S" 



P 
ors fi 
the 
view 
lies 
of ( 
poU 
this 
so I 
The 
div: 
ing 
effl 
est 
of 
to 
St 
go 
Sp 
thf 
in 
in 
of 
tai: 
ba< 
vie 
nai 
the 
wa. 
ab£ 
ish 
tior 
for 
wen 
the 
Spa 
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repi 
min 
of i 
witl 
that 
of S 
prov 
com: 
perit 
railv 
abou 
read 
book 
the 



Quick Frozen Foods 
Are Shipped to Europe 

Experiments Prove Succegg of 
Method in Exporting 

Experimental shipments to Europe 
of Birdseye quick frozen foods have 
been made by Frosted Foods, Inc.. and 
have met with success, according to an 
article by Colby M. Chester jr., presi- 
dent of General Foods Corporation, in 
the "Food Securities Review," Chandler 
& Co.'s semi-monthly publication. 

Mr. Chester states his belief that 
quick freezing will help solve the 
problem of shipping perishable foods 
from one country to another, and cites 
' a number of inquiries his company 
has received from represejitatives of 
perishable food industries throughout 
Europe, South America and Australia. 
He says that Frosted Foods, Inc., is 
about to extend retail sales of quick 
frozen foods throughout New England, 
He considers the new process as signifi- 
, cant a development in the food indus- 
try AS the invention and adoption of 
the tin can. 

The president of General Foods 
points out that the manufacture and 
distribution of food products, the 
largest industry in the country, is 
growing faster than population, and in 
analysis of food product companies, 
ahows that fifteen food product com- 
panies reported an increase of 6.1 per 
cent for the first quarter of 1930 over 
the first quarter of 1929. as against a 
19.2 per cent decrease in net profits 
on the part of twenty-four groups of 
Industrial compajiies. 



fs 
P 
Pi 
Aj 
wt 
El 
mt 
Co 
toe 
cer 
g 

for 

post 

pan 

Savi 

Com 



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each 
were 
awar 
ceive 
sewa 
1930, 
An ii 
gestc. 
ent r 

Th( 
Augu 
highP 
matu; 
will t 
Comnr 
coupe 
per ce 

Pecc 
on Jul 
5'/2 pe. 
ties wi 
they wi 
1931 to 



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SAY MAN ^ veGr^TAPiE 



U, 



PERIODICALS 
THE BIOCHEMICAL JOURNAL. Edited for the 

Biochemical Society by Harold Dudley ^Ward 

and Arthur Harden. Vol. XXJV.. No. 1,»1930. 

1DX7^, 227 pp. Cambridge University Press. 

17s. 6d. n. 
The hotisewife of to-day can no longer trust in Mrs. 
Beeton alone; her library must include a text-book 
of physiology and, if she is to be really up to date, 
the Biochemical Journal. In this number, for 
example, she will learn from M. F. Bracewell, E. 
iHoyle and S, S. Zilva that the best apples to Rive 
her household are Bramley's Seedlings, for these 
have the greatest anti-scorbutic activity of any. If, 
[however, she must bfty foreign fruit, let her inquire 
Rvhere it was picked, for anti-scorbutic potency 
'deteriorates with storage. Furthermore, she will 
be assured that baking her apples does not harm 
them in this respect. Then in summer, if she wishes 
to provfde the anti-scorbutic factor in lemonade 
form, she should note the paper by J. Williams 



jj|and J. W. Corran, and give home-made lemonade, 
wffor these authors point,. out that tliose substances 



■ which exert the strongest preservative action 
I against fermentation possess the greatest destruc- 
Itive action on the factor in question. There are 
jj seven other papers on the accessory food-factors, 
and they range from the report of an investigation 
of the mysterious and elusive " bios " to an article 
by M. J. Rowlands and B. Wilkinson which seeks 
to prove a relationship between certain manures 
and the vitamin-B content of seeds grown with 
their aid. As for " bios," by a chemical separation 
of it from vitamLn-Bj, B. T. Narayanan has suc- 
ceeded in showing that the two are not similar, nor 
the one a part of the other — views that have at 
times be^ held. 

Happily not of such universal interest as the 
accessory food-factors, yet occupying the minds of 
many, is the prqblem of cancer. From the chemical 
standpoint this^isordered grow^ may he con- 
sidered in two ways : either as caused nby the 
presence of a chemical factor absent from normal 
tissue, or as caused by the absence of some factor 
norma^y jiresent in adj*kr tissue. yiS. T. Harrkon 
and E. ]\]^llanby hold the latter view, and ^ey 
now describe experiments to determine Avhether the 
addition of normal-tissue extracts to cancer could 
change the metabolism characteristic of malignant 
tissue. They chose, for sound reasons too lengthy 
to. detail here, to observe the change in the glyco- 
lytic (glycogen-splitting) activity of cancer brought 
about by the addition of pancreatic extracts. Their 
results, iu opposition to those of others, show that 
such preparations inhibit the glycolytic action of 
cancerous tissue. Many other new facts are brought 
I to light in the article, which should be read by all 
I interested in the subject. 





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8ee Review, p. 232. 

! S?:AvSOXAL variation IX 3L\N. (A Theory.) 
Bj^ EDiiuND Hughes. 7^X5; X. + 126 pp. Lewis. 
6.5. . . 

Tlie seed- of this little book was sown when its 
author Avas investigating the periodicity of the 
occurrence of rickets. He then concluded that the 
periodicity of that disease was a manifestation of 
some underlying, as yet miappreciated, normal 
seasonal variation in man and other mammals. He 
now brings forward the hypothesis that "human 
physiology, in common probably with that of all 
other mammals, was built up on the expectation of 
annual inactive periods, that is on tlie expectation 
of seasonal sleep, together with what this in- 
volves ; and that, in a heat-stable mammal, such 
as man, traces of the cliemico-phj'siological rhythm 
implied by this m:iy still be present under appro- 
priate physical and other conditions." In support 
of this the author has collected facts from many 
fields, and has endeavoured to explain them on 
the basis of his hypothesis. For example, he con- 
cludes from the work of v-atious investigators that 
the pre-hibernation (stoiage) stage is due to depres- 
sion of pituitary gland function. From this he 
then argues that the depasition of fat in Frolich's 
disease (a disease marked by decreased pituitary 
function) occurs, not because the causes normally 
preventing fat-deposition are removed, but because 
there is a recrudescence of part of an old and still 
existing seasonal mechanism associated with de- 
cliiie in functional activity of the gland in ques- 
tion. On the oth^r .hand, he considers that the 
stage of preparation for active life is due to a 
i depletion of parathyroid gland reserve with its 
i concomitant guanidine accumulation, and he in- 
■ geniously compares the spasmodic and tetanic 
: movements produced in cases when there is a de- 
' cline m, or loss of, parathyroid function with the 
movements that an animal might make on being 
nroused from a prolonged state of helplessness. In 
support of a similar seasonal awakening in man he 
I brings birth-rate ligures to show that there is a de- 
I finite increase in the incidence of birth at a certain 
time of the year, and lie regards this as indicating 
that the vigour of the chemistry of reproduction 
receives an effective seasonal addition, and con- 
siders this feature compatible with the idea of pre- 
paration for the assumption of active life. 

The purely hypothetical nature of these ideas is 
frankly acknowledged. But the book is certainly 
stimulating, )iot only l^ecause it may provide pegs 
on which to hang serious research, but because it 
reminds us of a fact too often forgotten, by laymen 
and medical men alike, that man is only part of a 
system of animate nature. 

EARLY SCIEXCE IX OXFORD. By R. T. 
GuNTHER. Vol. \'11I. The Cutler Lectures of 



Sun-Diet Health Service, Inc. 

106 Cazenovia St., East Aurora, N. Y. 

Please send me your book "Health via Food" for free exam- 
ination. After 10 days. I %vill send payment of $3.50 or return the 

book. 



n 




"I WOULDN'T TAKE 
5400 FOR THIS BOOK 

Writes One Man Who Regained 
Priceless Good Health After 
Reading It. 

He is One of Thousands, — 
Many Hopelessly 111 and 
Despondent, Who Have 
Found the Secret of Certain 
Recovery and Future Happi- 
ness in This Amazing Book. 

Wm. Howard Hay, M.D., Director of the internationally 
famous Sun-Diet Sanatorium, has written a book, "Health via 
Food," in which he sets forth clearly and convincingly his meth- 
ods for regaining radiant health, energy and vitality. Twenty 
years of success prove that he is right. If you are ill, fatigued, 
discouraged or depressed, you will find this book of great help 
to you. 

What Causes Fatigue and Disease? 

Dr. Hay will prove to you that fatigue and disease are self- 
created; therefore you have within yourself the power to elimi- 
nate them. He will show you how tliese ills begin at the dinner 
table and how you can end tliem at the same place. He will teach 
you how to rid your system of all poisons, without the use of 
drugs, and how to give your pody a chance to rehabilitate itself. 
You have heard all this before? Perhaps, — but you haven't 
read Dr. Hay's book! 

Chronic Cases Easily Corrected 

Would you be surprised to know that Dr. Hay has restored 
to perfect health tliousands of chronic cases, some of whom were 
passed up by most of the leading specialists in the country? You 
will not be surprised at this statement after reading this book. 
And there is nothing mysterious about his methods. They work 
no hardships. The basis is simply detoxication of the body first 
and then the eating of foods you now eat in the correct com- 
binations. 

Perhaps you think you are well. Are you? Do you know how 
disease begins? Can you recognize early signs? Perhaps you have 
headaches, colds, insomnia, bad breath ... or a more serious 
disorder such as asthma, rheumatism, kidney trouble or ulcers 
of the stomach. No matter . . . this book will be of great help, 
to you. 

We are so sure that you will find it of value, we will send you a 
copy for 10 days' free examinatf&n ... if you find your book 
dealer does not carry it. Send no money; simply mail the 
coupon. 

f 




5VN-DIET HEALTH SERVICE 



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Don't Eat Yourself Into Grippe- 
It's the Intake of "Ashes'' That Counts 



With all of us up against the proposi- 
tion of nothing to eat but food, a modi- 
fication of the great indoor pastime is 
suggested by George E. Cornforth, dieti- 
cian of the New England Sanitarium and 
Hospital at Melrose. Mr. Cornforth holds, 
and has the records of the institution 
back of him to prove it, that colds can 
be prevented by proper diet. 

"If you catch cold, you've been eating 
it for the last two weeks" is not strictly 
true, according to Mr. Cornforth, but has 
a modicum of proper diagnosis in that 
one literally can eat his way into a cold, 
or. grippe. 

If you are "subject to colds," you prob- 
ably are eating too much "acid ash food." 
That's bad. What you ought to do is to 
ctit down on this and fill up on good 
"alkaline ash foods" before all foods taste 
like any kind of ashes to the grippe- 
laden '*taste buds," to wit, the oval 
group of spindle-shaped cells <the gusta- 
tory cells) which, in man, occur in the 
fiCLthellum on the circum vallate and Bome 
of the fungiform papilla© of the tongue. 
on the base of the tongue, and on the 
anterior pillars of the fauces. 

No slams at home cooking, but the 
trouble today, according to Mr. Corn- 
forth, is that most people eat too much 
of the routine, conventional breakfast- 
luncheon-dinner combinations with a key- 
'one of a meat course. They use what 
ey ought to eat in the gross simply as 
.side-dish. The food balance is all wrong 
nd by his dietetic schedule the "side- 
sh" becomes the mainstay of the family 
ble if one wishes to dodge a cold. 
All this revolves around the potential 
•idity or alkalinity of foods and the 
-duction or increase of alkalinity of the 
ood. In cold-prevention the Idea is to 
-ep up the natural alkanlinity of the 
ood because when that is reduced the 
itality of the body is reduced. At the 
Hospital It has been found that even in 
he present widespread siege of grippe 
ere is no sign of epidemic and people 
ho say they have always been subject 

' colds are free for the first tim© In 
inir lives. 

The standard breakfast is too largely 

i. Mr. Cornforth asserted. Cereal, \ 

toast, coffee and all the rest are not : 

'd. If cereal, leave out the ft.gg: egg. • 

ve out the cereal. As carte du jour i 

o start the day right for cold-dods:er<? if ' 

lot epicures he suggests three balanced j 

!ondbi nations- ! 

BREAKFAST 
Rolled oats 

Milk ' I 

Bread (one slice) ' 

Butter 
Orange 
Apple sauce 
Almonds 



DINNER 
Vegetable soup 
Lima beans 
Baked potato 
Creamed carrots 
Spinach 

Lettuce and tom«.to salad 
Olives 

Bread (one slice) 
Honey 

SUPPER 
Cream of tomaco soup 
Bread (ohe slice) 
Fruit salad 
Stuffed dates 
Apple tapioca 
Whipped cream 

As preface to the balanced diet, which, 
after all is simply doing, by properly 
chosen foods, what the physician does 
n using soda as a cold cure, Mr. Corn- 
orth outlines the need for fresh air, sun- 
shine, outdoor exercise, avoiding con- 
■=^tipation and keeping out of crowds. 
He is firm on four to six or eight glasses 
i day of fruit juice — orangeade or lemon- 
ade with little or no sugar — or tomato 
iuice, drunk freely between meals. 

He also is of the spinach and carrot 
school on the necessary Vitamin A and 
to take the curse off these, adds ripe 
olives. This is of particular importance 
because Vitamin A is necessary to main- 
tain the normal mucus membrane where 
the germs become entrenched in the body. 
For Vitamin D he recommends a good ! 
coat of tan during the summer. f 

Candy is on the "don't" list of Mr. 
Cornforth. He substitutes honey and 
natural sweets and declares that sugar 
and white flour are "cold producers." He 
advocates very simple desserts: raisins, 
nuts, a bit of maple sugar, stewed figs, 
sherbets, ices, vegetable gelatine dishes. 

It is his advice, in this base-forming 
diet to raise the alkalinity of the blood 
and maintain' high resistance to disease, 
to discard meats (fish, flesh and fowl), 
tea and coffee; to use eggs sparingly, 
cereals moderately, vegetables, especially 
greens, freely, and fruits freely. 

A box-score of the potential acidity or 
alkalinity per 100 grams, according to 
the hospital leaflet on the subject, lists 
foods as follows: 

ACID ASH ALKALINE ALKALINE 
FOODS ASH FOODS ASH FOODS 



Chicken ..17 
Fish .....16 
Oysters . . 15 

Veal 14 

Beef 14 

Oatmeal ..13 

Pork 12 

Eggs 11 

Rioe 8 

Walnuts . . 8 

Bread 7 

Cheese ... 6 
Peanuts . . 4 
Green com 2 



Molasses 

Ripe olives 

Dried lima beans. 

Spinach 

Other dried beans. 

Raisins 

Swiss chard . . . . 

Almonds 

Parsnii»s 

Dates 

Figs 

Cucumbers 

Celery 

Muskmelon 



56 Lettuce . 

56 Potatoes 

42 I>ried peu 

27 Apricots 

24 Pineapple 

24 Oranges 

16 Bananas 

12 Tomatoes 

12 Lemons . . .5 

11 String beans. 5 

10 Cauliflower.. 5 
8 Peaches ... 5 
8 Cabbasa ...4 
7 Apples 4 



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BUTESIN PICRATE 

OINTMENT 



CMM 



Topical anesthetic — analgesic 
for severe sunburns, industrial 
hums, scalds, ulcerations, 
ahrasions and other injuries. 



ABBOTT LABORATORIES 

NORTH CHIC AGO . ILLI N Ol S. U.S.A. 



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DENTAL ADVISORY BOARD 



MEDICAL ADVISORY BOARD 



GEORGE PHILLIPS. D.O.S. 
BOSTON. MASS. 

F. H. ERBE. D.O.S. 

WATERBURY. CONN. 

A V NEEDHAM. D.O.S. 
ONEIDA, N. Y. 

HENRY E. OERMANN. D.O.S. 
CINCINNATI, OHfO 

FRANK H. SKINNER. D.O.S. 
CHICAGO. ILL. 

F. W. MEACHAM, D.D.S 

CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 

H. MILLER RICE. D.O.S. 

KANSAS CITY. MO. 

FREDERICK A. BRICKER, D.D.S. 
HOLLYWOOD. CALIF 



FOUNDED MAY. 1922 




FRANK D. BITTINGER. M. D. 
OBERLIN. OHIO 



LEO C. DONNELLY. M.D. 

DETROIT. MICH. 



ROBERT G. JACKSON. M. D, 
TORONTO, ONT. 



OSCAR JONES. M.D. 

INDIANAPOLIS. INO. 



IRVING J. EALES, M.D. 
CHICAGO, ILL. 



DALTON RICHARDSON. M.D. 
AUSTIN. TEXAS 



W. E. REESE, D.O. 

TOLEDO. OHIO 



T he Defensive-Diet League of America wais organized in May 1 922, 
for the qurpose of teaching the correct selection, proportion and prepar- 
ation of our ordinary foods. Originally its membership was made up 
entirely of professional men — dentists, physicians, dietitians, hygienists, 
etc. As the organization grew, the demand for the education of those 
who are not professional people became so urgent that it was neces- 
sary to form an Associate Membership for this purpose. This 
phase of the work has been most successful, our satisfied and en- 
thusiastic members making possible greatly increased growth. 

That instruction giving the correct use of foods is greatly 
needed is very plainly evident to anyone who will thoughtfully con- 
sider statistics made up each year by departments in the U. S. Gov- 
ernment at Washington. 

Those records show the following startling figures: 

A half-million deaths each year from old-age diseases between the 
ages of 40 and 60. Nearly 1 00% of these deaths are due to preventable 
diseases, and most of them have their origin in some part of the digestive 
tract and are caused by incorrect eating. 

A half-million deaths each year of children under the age of ten. 































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exclusive of infants, solely and entirely because they have not been 
properly fed. The enormous death-rate among school children may be 
very greatly reduced by correct feeding, before as well as after birth. 

At least 85% of the children in our schools have very poor teeth. 
Poor teeth in childhood are always the result of improper eating by the 
mother before the birth of the child, and of equally improper feeding of 
the child after birth. 

Ten times as many bottle-fed babies die during their first year as of 
those who are fed at the mother's breast. 

Only 40%, less than half, of the adults of the United States are self- 
supporting. The other 60% are supported by their relatives, by theii 
friends, or at public expense in jails, alms-houses, sanitaria, and hos- 
pitals, filled by victims of incorrect eating, many of whom would be 
useful citizens if they had been correctly instructed. 

Loss of time on account of illness that might have been prevented by 
proper diet, costs this country every year not far from ten billions of 
dollars, many billions of dollars more than the cost of conducting our 
government. 

All of these calamitous conditions depend in large part if not entire- 
ly upon the incorrect selection and combination of common, everyday 
foods, and may be avoided by proper attention to diet. 

Elxperiments conducted over a series of years have demonstrated that a 
very large proportion of the supposedly incurable diseases may be 
"cured" by proper diet — and that practically all of them can be pre- 
vented. 

Dietarians know, from human feeding tests, that most of the 
combinations of foods served in the average home recommended by 
"home journals" and syndicate writers, are hopelessly bad, little better 
than slow poison; is it any wonder that we suffer from colds, "flu," 
constipation, rheumatism and numerous other ailments? 

Associate Membership in the Defensive-Diet League offers the best 
available dietary information, told in simple, interesting language. 
Our Cook Book suggests delicious and palatable menus, in accordance 
with our teachings, and gives many original and unique recipes, with 
complete instructions for preparing meals. 

Our 80/20 Cook-Book Service is without a rival as a kitchen guide 
and food manual. 

Of course, the League cannot hope to reach all classes of people. 
There are many even in this enlightened age who look upon those who 
observe the principles of correct eating as "cranks," and. we are frank 
to admit, this is not the class of people we want as members of this 
organization. Our membership is made up of clear-thinking, intelligent 
progressive men and women, and such a personnel we wish to maintain. 

Associate membership in the League entitles you to all previous issues 
of Bulletins, one full year's advance service, twelve Bulletins, as 



issued, a good binder for preserving them, and one of our famous House 
hold Charts; and, for an additional sum of $6.00 a complete copy of! 
the most remarkable Cook Book ever devised. Notice description 
herewith. 

Simple dietary questions are answered without charge. Certificates 
of Membership and Personal Advisory Coupons are included with 
your binder and Bulletins. One of these coupons, accompanied by 
a small extra fee, entitles you to direct, personal advice con- 
cerning treatment of disease from one of our Medical Advisory Board, a 
service that could not be had for many times the cost by any except 
members. 

We test foods and recommend or condemn them as they deserve. 
We furnish information concerning sources of supplies of pure foods, 
and supply many of them at low cost to our members. We recommend 
and sell books on dietary subjects, and approved kitchen utensils. We 
give positive and complete urinalysis by competent, high-grade 
chemists, at very small cost. 

These are a few of the many services that we offer you. 

There are health schools that charge from $50 to $500 for informa- 
tion not nearly so accurate or scientific. Our fee is only $1 0.00 first year; 
after first year. $5.00 per year —or $16.00 including Cook Book. 

Cook-Book Serial Service to members per year, 1 2 monthly numbers, 
$7.00. To non-members, $10.00. Monthly sections $1.00 each. 

Our whole purpose is to furnish you dependable information about the 
correct selection, combination, and preparation of the foods that you 
eat every day and to guide you in their preparation. 

Enclosed is a sample Bulletin and miniature Chart. Also sample 
pages of cook-book. 

Use second page of this Prospectus as application blank. 

Bulletins are issued monthly. Study each one very carefully and 
preserve it in the binder supplied for that purpose. Do not try to read 
the Bulletins rapidly; absorb them, catch their spirit of helpfulness, 
put into practice the instructions given for the benefit of yourself and 
family, and you will be abundantly rewarded by improved health, free- 
dom from illness, greater efficiency, comfort and happiness. 

Very truly, 
DEFENSIVE-DIET LEAGUE OF AMERICA 
619-620 Spitzer Bldg.. Toledo, Ohio 



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of Pancreobismuth has been achieved 
solely on the merit of the product, 
with no advertising other than occa- 
sional professional announcements to 
physicians. 

In Portland the Geo. C. Frye Co. 
is recognized as an important institu- 
tion, serving the leading hospitals 
and physicians. 

Pancreobismuth and Pepsin can be 
obtained at all first-class drug stores. 
If your druggist does not have it on 
hand, ask him to order it of his 
wholesaler, or write to us direct. 

GEO. C. FRYE CO. 
Portland, Me. 



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PANCREOBISMUTH 
AND PEPSIN 

TRADE MARK KEG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 

cA Valuable oAid 

to the digestion of Protein 

and oAlbumin 



GEO. C. FRYE CO. 



PORTLAND. MAINE 



PANCREOBISMUTH 
AND PEPSIN 

PANCREOBISMUTH and Pepsin 
contains in adequate amounts the 
enzymes pepsin and trypsin, both of 
which are valuable aids in the diges- 
tion of albumin and other proteins. 

If you take the white of an egg 
(albumin) and mix it in a glass with 
a suitable quantity of pepsin and 
water, adding a few drops of hydro- 
chloric acid, the egg white will grad- 
ually dissolve. This is similar to what 
occurs during digestion. 

There are other enzymes which, in 
tests outside the body, digest starch 



and fats, respectively. Amylopsm di- 
gests starch, and steapsin fats. Both 
of these enzymes are present in pan- 
creatin, one of the constituents of 
Pancreobismuth. 

Another enzyme contained in Pan- 
creobismuth and Pepsin is taka-dias- 
tase. In tests outside the body, taka- 
diastase converts from loo to 300 
times its weight of starch into sugars, 
whereas ordinary diastase (found in 
many preparations on the market) 
has this action on only 50 times its 
weight. In addition, taka-diastase is 
more cc«istant and dependable. 

Aside from these enzymes, Pan- 
creobismuth contains other important 



medication : namely, bismuth sub- 
nitrate, sodium bicarbonate and pow- 
dered ginger. 

Bismuth subnitrate is a mild astrin- 
gent and sedative. It allays minor 
irritation of the mucous membrane 
of the stomach. 

Sodium bicarbonate is antacid and 
tends to counteract excessive acidity 
of the stomach. 

Powdered ginger belongs to the 
class of medicaments known as car- 
minatives and stomachics. It gives 
the stomach a grateful feeling of 
warmth and is mildly stimulating to 
the flow of digestive juice. 

The ingredients mentioned are 



combined in Pancreobismuth to make 
a powder which dissolves in suitable 
quantities of water and is pleasant to 
the taste. 

Insufficient digestion of 
oAlbumin or 'Protein 

When there is insufficient digestion 
of albumin or protein, Pancreobis- 
muth serves as a valuable aid. Half 
a teaspoonful should be taken in a 
wineglassful of lukewarm water after 
meals. 

Flatulence ^ue to Fermentation 
Avoid an excess of starchy foods and 
take from one-half to one level tea- 
spoonful of Pancreobismuth in a 



wineglassful of lukewarm water after 
meals. 

Heartburn and Excessive cAcidity 
Pancreobismuth tends to neutralize 
excess of acid and allay irritation. 
Take a level teaspoonful in a wine- 
glassful ot lukewarm water. 

'belching 
When belching is due to fermenta- 
tion or insufficient digestion of albu- 
min and protein, it may be alleviated 
by treating as described under "insuf- 
ficient digestion of albumin or pro- 
tein." 

1)iredions 
Follow your physician's directions 



closely when takmg Pancreobism. 
and pay particular heed to the 
he orders. In the absence of sped 
instructions from the doctor, 
average adult dose of Pancreot 
muth is one-half to one teaspooni 
in a wineglassful of lukewarm wai 
three times daily after meals. 

The Firm behind the ^rodud 

The Geo. C. Frye Co. has been mt 
ufacturing Pancreobismuth in Po 
land, Me., since 1890. The prepa 
tion stands in high repute with t 
medical profession and is widely p 
scribed throughout New England a 
New York. The growth in the sa 



cje I rary benefits. 



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MAGIC IN THE FOOD FIELD.' 

Facts Are Hampering to the Fad- 
dist, Says A. M. A. Journal. 
Belief in magic is still widespread 
among vast numbers of people, 
states The Journal of the American 
Medical Association. Even physi- 
cians, presumably scientifically 
trained, are not free from extraor- 
dinary and mystical notions, par- 
ticularly in the fields of diet and 
allergy', the publication continues. 
To diet Dr. Mary Swartz Rose pays 
special atterrtion in a recent review 
of strange .notions in this filld, 
presented as an address before the 
American Dietetic Association. 
After paying her respects to the 
folly of fletcherization. sheVnalyzes I 
some of the views hel^ by modern 
food faddists, including those who I 
insist that combinations* ■f)f acid | 
fruits with meat or eggs will gen- j 
erate alcohol in the stomach, and j 
that it is dangerous to mix proteins i 
and starches. She points out that 
our daily bread and daily potatoes I 
happen to be mixtures of this char- | 
acter. I 

"After all. facts are hampering 
for the faddist." says the writer. 
"Of late the notion that acidity 
must always be combated and 
dietary alkalinity promoted has 
been especially featured in the ! 
promulgations of the food cultists. 
Every time a new fact is discovered { 
In the food field some promoter 
exploits that fact for commercial I 
gam. The mere emphasis by Pro- j 
fessor H. C. Sherman on the pos- i 
sibility of deficiencies in calcium in ' 
the American diet led to the ex- ] 
ploitation of mineralized candy, ! 
with the argument that calcium de- | 
ficiency was responsible for dia- 
betes and cancer. j 

"Dr. Rose particularly compli- ; 
mented the work of the American ■ 
Medical Association in exposmg j 
such notions. Thus, she said to 
dietitians: 'Make use of the in- I 
foimation which can be obtained I 
from the American Medical Asso- j 
elation. Its reports, the results of 
seasoned judgment as to what may 
be legitimately said of these fakers, 
are most helpful.' 

"Today there are 2,500 members 
in the American Dietetic Associa- 
tion, presumably scientifically I 
trained in good nutrition. Their co- I 
operation with the medical profes- i 
sion in educating the public regard- j 
ipg the danger of belief in magic ' 
will be invaluable for ad\'&.ncement 
of public knowledge in ' the food 
field." 




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Nursiii^ mothers throve on it, farm uniTnaj g g^ew 
■le«k and strongs when soybeans were mixed in their 
diet; men and women, ill of a long list of wasting. 
degeneraUve and digestive ailments, grew better 
and often recovered entirely when they ate soy- 
bean concoctions plentifully. Aa far back as 2838 
B. C. the Emperor Shen-Nung, an all-round pundit 
of China's ancient sciences, listed 300 ways in 
which soy products were good for human ailments. 



and you can almost taste its usefulness to factories. 
A rich, thick, mealy quality, a slight but not un- 
pleasant nutty hardness, set it apart from all other 
beans. 

It is the protein quaUty which gives a pound of 
soybeans the nutritive value of more than two 
pounds of beefsteak, more than two quarts of milk. 
It is the quality which fattens hogs and beef cattle, 
strengthens farm work animals and has enabled 
Chinese for fifty centiu-ies to live in health and 
vigor on a meatless, milkless diet. No other bean 
approaches this protein content. Protein in the 
familiar navy bean averages 21 per cent. But pro- 
tein in edible soybeans ranges from 32 to above 40 
per cent, and in the plant types specially bred and 
"burbanked" for industrial uses in the last two 
decades it sometimes reaches 55 per cent. 



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WHAT WE EAT AND WHAT HAPPENS TO IT 

By Philip B. Hawk 

The conclusions in this volume are based on the most elaborate 
series of food investigations ever made. They have been carried 
on for several years in the Department of Physiological Chemistry 
at Jefiferson Medical College, Philadelphia, and by new methods, 
results have been obtained which have absolutely upset many of 
the cherished theories of layman and physician. 



HARPER & BROTHERS Established 1817 NEW YORK 



Ik Soap Plant of flie West 

NATURE'S OWN SUBSTITUTE 
5L?^^?2A^- ^"^S OCCURRENCE 
IN THE VEGETABLE KING- 

SStor?^''^^''^™^ ^^^ 

ITS CLEANSING PROPERTIES 
HOW IT IS USED. 
WHAT IT WILL DO. 





Trade Mark Res. 

Eoot reproduces iv. Iw T^i ^ l" "/"^ germinate. The mtnrL.. sJ^ X?- f®^^' spores 

is very littl= ;>,vi „ '^ ■•'? ^««'" to enjoy this m',nV,<>VT'^*''"e, they yield an 

i-.T?*:?-"? .Ifi»»t Sh«v.„ E„ «,e Picture Herewifi Package. 

■"'■""" ^'f/^"'>'«>e Saml Hills 
S,.xteen Feet i„ I^eiisth. 



S. Th.. Trade Ma.k serves to identify SATMAN'S 




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PurJ?'V-a"e.^e"ir:J\n"a"1ts^^^rje lr'a"c'i^rn .„ ^ - 
'• ,f/'^ir-J>' Ve..etal.,e Wonder ..„„„ is h'htv ''" - 



toilet, bath, scaTp„._ .u,„„,»v 
nder. sensitive ^kin." Sho'u'JJi^l.-e"' 



^'EGETABLE WONDER 
f 9 A P which con- 
tains no animal fat. 
silicate of soda, talc 
China clay, or other 
filler of any kind, but 
IS of vegetable origin 
flee from the objec- 
tions attached to oth- 
er soaps which may be 
made from grease ex- 
tracted from diseased 
animal carcasses. In- 

crts'"^h„',^*' °^ "^"a'- 

^-dts, horses cattle 
sheep, and even chol.' 
era hogs. 

tabSe Wonder SoaTia 

^ "^--itorious article! 

mu'nuV"wrr7ve?"lt 

has been introduced. 

Its standard of 



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